Middle School Academics

Grade 7 Academics

Grade 7 STEM Electives

 
STEM electives in middle school are important building blocks in the preparation of all students for demands of college, careers, and the rapidly changing 21st century workforce.  STEM courses teach students to apply mathematics, science, and technical knowledge to innovate and solve problems.  MCPS is committed to providing a well-rounded education for middle school students that includes an engaging, hands-on experience with computational learning.  Middle school STEM electives teach students computational and technological literacy through coding, computer science, engineering, and other technology and design-related experiences.  This program promotes creative problem solving and an exploration of multiple STEM related fields of study and careers.


Grade 7 MS Principles of IT, Cybersecurity and Engineering Courses STEM Electives*

MP

MP

Principles of IT: Digital Systems (ITC2070)

Students will explore digital systems and devices, by investigating the key components. They begin with defining, identifying and classifying hardware and software and then investigate input and output devices, storage and processing elements.  Students will learn a variety of problem-solving strategies to apply to problems with digital systems. Students will further develop their understanding of software applications, extensions and Cloud-based programs.

Principles of IT: Cybersecurity  (ITC2071)

Students will learn how information travels across the Internet and networks

and how to protect electronic information.  Real-world cybersecurity problems are explored

along with current best practices to protect users, systems and networks.

Students will learn about a variety of careers in cybersecurity.  Course content includes the

legal and ethical issues involved with computer technology use.

MP

MP

Innovation and Engineering Design (ENR 1025)

Students learn the importance of invention and innovation in technological development and apply engineering-thinking skills and technical skills to complete each step of the engineering design process to creatively address a real world challenge. Students learn or extend technical drawing and Computer Aided Design skills. This course is accessible for students who have not taken the Grade 6 Engineering courses.

Applied Engineering Design (ENR1024)

Students learn how societal factors affect technological development and apply the engineering design process, engineering-thinking skills, and technical skills including Computer Aided Design to design engineering solutions to real-world challenges.

*Schools may offer 1 to 4 of these quarter long courses


Other Grade 7 Electives

Computer Science Discoveries

Grade 7 Invention and Engineering (ENR1017)

Computer Applications

Grade 7 English (ENG1011)
Grade 7 Adv English (ENG1012)

The goal of the Secondary English Language Arts program is to create literate, thoughtful communicators, capable of controlling language effectively as they negotiate an increasingly complex and information-rich world. As students leave elementary school, they encounter new academic expectations such as analyzing varied and complex texts, developing arguments, synthesizing information from multiple sources, examining different perspectives, and engaging in self-reflection. Students work to acquire specific skills and strategies in reading literature, reading informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language.

MS Academic Literacy (ENG1029)

This course involves implementation of iLit, a reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of struggling readers through differentiated instruction, computer adaptive instruction, background-knowledge-building videos, high-interest literature, and explicit instruction in reading, writing, and vocabulary skills.

Digital Literacy 1 (ENG1030)

The Digital Literacy 1 curriculum focuses on developing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing in a 21st-century approach. Working through a problem-based process, students learn to define real-world problems of interest, research the causes of those problems using real-time global texts, and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will advance their understanding of comprehension, analysis, and evaluation of text as well as vocabulary acquisition through reading complex informational and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will collaborate regularly through research and solution phases of their investigations. Students' curiosity and motivation will engage them in their investigations while learning and refining the processes that will enrich all other courses and prepare them for college and career projects.

MS Digital Literacy 2 (ENG1031)

The Digital Literacy 2 curriculum focuses on increasing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing through an integrated approach. By participating in a problem-based process, students learn to define, analyze, and evaluate real-world problems of interest related to standards-based curriculum topics. Students will use research skills to investigate problems using real-time global texts and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will participate in sustained inquiry, analysis, and evaluation of text through reading complex informational, expository, and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will hone their communication, collaboration, research, and problem-solving skills and learn to give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products during complex tasks. Digital Literacy creates authentic work for students to engage in by allowing for presentation of their solutions beyond the walls of the classroom.

The English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program provides high-quality English language development instruction aligned to grade-level content standards in English Language Arts. These courses focus on helping students develop the academic language proficiency needed to be able to learn content knowledge, skills, and processes and effectively use language to communicate proficiently in mainstream courses.
These courses are designed for the rapid mastery of the English language, focusing on reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. ESOL courses usually begin with extensive listening and speaking practice, building on auditory and oral skills, and support the development of reading and writing. These courses provide an explanation of grammat- ical structures of the English language, enabling students to progress from a basic under- standing of English words and verb tenses to a more comprehensive grasp of various formal and informal styles to prepare them for grade-level mainstream English courses. ESOL classes may also include an orientation to the customs and culture of the diverse population in the United States.  All ESOL courses are aligned to the grade-level standards and curriculum in Grades 6-8.
 ESOL students will be scheduled into English classes designed to meet their level of academic language proficiency in appropriate ways including sheltered, co-taught, single and double periods. ESOL levels will be aligned to the English Language Proficiency (ELP) levels 1.0-4.4 on the WIDA ACCESS test.

Grade Level 

Course 

New Course Code #

Notes (i.e. HS credit) 

 

Grade 6

English 6 for English Learners (ELs) I

ESL1014

Double Period

English 6 for ELs II

ESL 1017

Double Period

English 6 for ELs III

ESL 1020

Single Period 

 

Grade 7 

English 7 forELs I

ESL1015

Double Period

English 7 for ELs II

ESL 1018

Double Period

English 7 for ELs III

ESL 1021

Single Period

 

Grade 8 

English 8 forELs I

ESL 1016

Double Period

English 8 for ELs II

ESL 1019

Double Period

English 8 for ELs III

ESL 1022

Single Period


Programs

Multidisciplinary Educational Training and Support Program (METS)

Family and Comsumer Sciences (EDU1002, EDU1003)

Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) programs focus on processes and skills that enhance individual, family, and societal well-being. Programs reflect the National Standards for FACS Education and integrate math, science, English, and social studies. A project-based curriculum encourages students to investigate and solve authentic problems. Students learn to use communication and critical-thinking skills as well as current technologies to make informed decisions.

UNIT 1: INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY, AND SOCIETAL NEEDS
UNIT 2: DECISION-MAKING PROCESS
UNIT 3: NUTRITION AND WELLNESS
UNIT 4: PERSONAL FINANCE
UNIT 5: LIVING ENVIRONMENTS
UNIT 6: COLLEGE AND CAREER PLANNING

FINE ARTS

The fine arts are important to every child’s development and play a vital role in providing students with a well-rounded, world class education. Dance, Music, Theatre, and Visual Art promote academic excellence, creative problem-solving, and social emotional learning, which are essential components of college and career readiness. In order to meet the evolving needs of a 21st century learner, the fine arts focus on developing artistic literacy by engaging in the artistic processes (creating, performing/presenting, responding, and connecting) through authentic materials and techniques. The fine arts introduce students to new world views and cultures, help students to value the perspectives of others, and enable students to creatively express a personal viewpoint. Through artistic experiences, students become independent and divergent thinkers, selfmotivated workers, and innovators. All students have access to fine arts programs in middle school. In Grades 6–8, students may specialize in one or more of the fine art forms.

Dance

Middle School Dance 1 (ART1064)

Students with no previous dance experience should begin at Level 1 in the dance sequence. This beginning course provides a survey of dance styles and elements

Middle School Dance 2 (ART1065)

In this intermediate level course, Grade 7 students will continue to develop technique in a variety of dance styles and skilled application of dance elements. Students may audition to qualify for this level or receive permission from the dance teacher to enter this course. This course may be taken for more than one year.

General Music

COURSE

NEW COURSE CODE 

NOTES

PIANO, MS 1

ART1048

Available to students in Grades 6-8

PIANO, MS 2

ART1049

Students must complete Piano, MS 1 or audition

GUITAR, MS 1

ART1043

Available to students in Grades 6-8

GUITAR, MS 2

ART1044

Students must complete Guitar, MS 1 or audition

GENERAL MUSIC, MS 1

ART1030

Available to students in Grades 6-8

GENERAL MUSIC, MS 2

ART1031

Students must complete General Music 1

GENERAL MUSIC, MS 3

ART1032

Students must complete General Music 2

Choral Music

MS Chorus 1 (ART1040)

Students will create, perform, and respond to music in a variety of styles/genres. Students will develop the fundamentals of proper vocal technique and choral singing in relation to posture, breath control, tone, intonation, diction, blending, singing in harmony, music literacy, and sight-singing. Students will primarily sing state level 2 music. There will likely be a minimum of two school concerts and students are expected to participate in all performances. This course is open to all students, regardless of music background.

MS Chorus 2 (ART1041)

Students will create, perform, and respond to music in a variety of styles/genres. Students will continue to develop the fundamentals of proper vocal technique and choral singing in relation to posture, breath control, tone, intonation, diction, blending, singing in harmony, music literacy, and sight-singing. Students will primarily sing state level 2-3 music. There will likely be a minimum of two school concerts as well as the opportunity to participate in other festivals/performances and students are expected to participate in all performances. An audition and/or a prerequisite of MS Chorus 1 may be required.

MS Chorus 3 (ART1042)

Students will create, perform, and respond to music in a variety of styles/genres. Students will continue to develop proper vocal technique and choral singing in relation to posture, breath control, tone, intonation, diction, blending, singing in harmony, music literacy, and sight-singing in multiple keys and parts. Students will primarily sing state level 3 music. There will likely be a minimum of two school concerts as well as the opportunity to participate in other festivals/performances and students are expected to participate in all performances. An audition and/or a prerequisite of MS Chorus 1 and/or 2 may be required.

Instrumental Music

Beginning Band (ART1037), Beginning Strings (ART1038)

This course is for students with no prior instrumental music experience. Students prepare for participation in performing ensembles and develop technical skills necessary to perform Grade 1 Level music, a performance level established by the National Association for Music Education and not a reference to first grade. Basic instrumental skills are developed by performing a variety of music. Students are taught the elements of musical form, terms and symbols, tone production, instrument care and maintenance, and the importance of consistent practice habits. Cultural context of the music and its historical significance as they relate to performance is studied. Students may attend live performances and perform in public. Students may be concurrently enrolled with 7892, 6845, 6815, and Middle School Band I (6880) or Orchestra I (6800) if necessary to run the course.

Middle School Band I (ART1033), Orchestra I (ART1045)

Students refine skills learned from their elementary Grade 4 and 5 instrumental music programs or in Middle School Beginning Band, String, or Wind and Percussion, and develop more advanced performance techniques. The development of technical skills necessary to perform Grade 1 to Grade 2 Level music is stressed. Emphasis is placed on developing formal rehearsal decorum, following a conductor, and developing pitch and rhythmic security in preparation for performing an independent part in the traditional band or orchestra ensemble. Students also learn melodic form and construction as they examine and perform more complex folk melodies and melodies from master composers. Students discuss the social and intellectual influences that affected the creation of the music they are studying. They begin to develop aesthetic criteria for measuring the quality of instrumental performance. Students may attend live performances and perform in public.

Prerequisite: Attainment of outcomes for Beginning Band, String, or Wind/Percussion Instruments in Grades 4–5 or 6–8.

Middle School Band II (ART1034), Orchestra II (ART1046)

Students develop and refine their technical skills in order to perform music at the Grade 2 Level of difficulty. Emphasis is placed on developing formal rehearsal decorum, following a conductor and developing pitch and rhythmic security in preparation for performing an independent part in the traditional band or orchestra ensemble. Students learn the social, cultural, and intellectual influences reflected in the musical works they are studying and discuss performance styles and musical forms of corresponding historical periods. The study of music theory includes performance and recognition of major scales, diatonic and chromatic intervals, and simple melodic dictation. The critical listening skills that are developed as a result of preparation for instrumental performance are used to help the student formulate criteria for effectively evaluating his/her own performance as well as the performance of others. This band or orchestra represents middle schools at public performances.

Prerequisite: Attainment of outcomes for Middle School Band I or Orchestra I. Students may also audition to qualify for this course. This course may be taken for more than one year.

Middle School Band III (ART1035), Orchestra III (ART1047)

Students distinguish between abstract and programmatic music and learn and discuss the social, intellectual, and historical influences on each. Students develop and refine their technical skills in order to perform music at the Grade 2 to Grade 3 Level of difficulty. In addition, students perform and historically categorize transcriptions of a variety of composers. This band or orchestra represents middle schools at public performances.

Prerequisite: Attainment of outcomes for Middle School Band II or Orchestra II. Students may also audition to qualify for this course. This course may be taken for multiple years.

Theatre

Middle School Theatre 1 (ART1061)

Students in Grades 6, 7, or 8 with no previous theatre experience should begin at Level 1 in the curricular sequence. In this beginning level course, students will explore how the theater is a space that both creates and challenges COMMUNITY. Theatre artists create an ensemble amongst themselves which functions as a safe space for risk-taking and creating. A sustained investigation of COMMUNITY in this intermediate level course engages students to study a variety of dramatic works, participate in the creation and enhancement of ensemble, and question the role of theatre within their COMMUNITY.

Middle School Theatre 2 (ART1062)

In MS Art Theatre 2, Grade 7 students explore a multitude of identities on and off the stage. Personal, familial, and cultural identities can provide a launchpad for exploring self, character, conflict, and personal approaches to theatre. IDENTITY is commonly at the root of nearly all dramatic works and is a defining element in a theatre artists’ approach to performance, design, production, and critique. A sustained focus on IDENTITY enables students to approach a variety of practices, games, dramatic works, traditions, and resources through a common lens, one which reinforces theatre’s eternal focus on “the human experience.”

Grade 8 students with no previous theatre experience may begin at Level 2 with permission of the theatre teacher.

Visual Art

Middle School Art 1

Students will be provided multiple and varied opportunities explore IDENTITY and the many ways this theme can be represented through visual art. Students will develop a fundamental understanding of ideation, media techniques, formal qualities, and compositional devices. Students in Grade 6, Grade 7, and Grade 8 with no previous art experience in middle school should begin at Level 1 in the visual art sequence.

  • Middle School Studio Art 1 (ART1024): Students will explore a variety of traditional student media and techniques including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and crafts to create artworks.
  • Middle School Digital Art and Photography 1 (ART1018): Students will utilize raster-based digital media and/or digital photography to create artworks.
Middle School Art 2

Students will explore how the theme of RELATIONSHIPS can be used to create artworks that communicate personal meaning and individual ideas. Students will gain a deeper understanding of how artists generate and conceptualize ideas, refine craftsmanship through practice and persistence, and intentionally arrange compositional elements to effectively communicate meaning. Students with no previous art experience may begin at Level 2 with permission of the visual art teacher.

  • Middle School Studio Art 2 (ART1025): Students will refine their ability to use traditional studio media and techniques including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and crafts to create artworks.
  • Middle School Digital Art and Photography 2 (ART1019): Students will design art using both vector and rasterbased software, and/or manually operate a digital camera and utilize photo editing software to create artwork.
Innovation Art Design Pathway

These year-long courses integrate visual art and computational thinking. By the end of the course, students will have mastered both the Maryland Technology Education Standards and the National Visual Art Standards. Students will investigate real-world problems, and then seek to design and create meaningful solutions via computational thinking and the artistic process.

  • Middle School Innovative Art & Design 1 (ART1008)
  • Middle School Innovative Art & Design 2 (ART1007)
  • Middle School Innovative Art & Design 3 (ART1016)

Health Grade 7 (HPE1001)

Comprehensive Health Education promotes positive health- related attitudes and behaviors that support self-reliance and self-regulation, while developing health literacy skills and lifelong wellness. The health literacy skills emphasized throughout the program include analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision making, goal-setting, self-management, and advocacy.
Beginning in the 2018-2019 school year, the Family Life and Human Sexuality unit will include age-appropriate instruction on the meaning of “consent” and respect for personal boundaries in every grade in which the curriculum is taught. Health Education aligns with Be Well 365 by emphasizing lifelong positive health-related attitudes and behaviors that promote self-reliance and self-regulation for all students.

Key Concepts

Grade 7 Mathematics (MAT1006)

Grade 7 Mathematics extends students’ understanding of mathematical concepts developed in Mathematics 6. Instruction at this level will focus on four areas: (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples. Students who successfully complete this course will be ready for Mathematics 8 in Grade 8, strengthening their foundation for the Common Core State Standards Algebra 1 in Grade 9. 

Mathematics 7 focuses on the Standards for Mathematical Practice to build a climate that engages students in the exploration of mathematics. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are habits of mind applied throughout the course so that students see mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Through this course, students will— 

  • Develop an understanding of proportionality to solve and graph single- and multi-step real-world and mathematical problems.
  • Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative rational numbers.
  • Create and interpret numerical and algebraic expressions and equations in one variable.
  • Reason about geometric relationships among two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures.
  • Compare two data distributions and generate data sets by random sampling.
  • Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

TOPICS OF STUDY:

  • Ratios and Proportional Relationships
    • Analyze proportional relationships and solve real-world and mathematical problems.
  • The Number System
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to rational numbers.
  • Expressions and Equations
    • Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
    • Create, interpret, and solve numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.
  • Geometry
    • Draw, construct, and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them.
    • Investigate problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume.
  • Statistics and Probability
    • Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population.
    • Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations.
    • Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.
Overview and Parent Guides
Investigations into Mathematics (MAT1013)

Investigations into Mathematics (IM) extends students’ understanding of mathematical concepts developed in Mathematics 6 and accelerates the pace of instruction to prepare for Algebra 1. This course compacts all of the Grade 7 Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and much of the Grade 8 CCSS into a single year. Students who successfully complete IM are prepared for Algebra 1 in Grade 8. The remaining Grade 8 CCSS are compacted into the Algebra 1 course. Instruction for IM will focus on four critical areas: (1) developing a unified understanding of number, recognizing fractions, decimals (including both those that have a finite or a repeating decimal representation), and percents as different representations of rational numbers; (2) using linear equations and systems of linear equations to represent, analyze, and solve a variety of problems; (3) comparing two data distributions and reasoning about differences between populations; and (4) analyzing geometric relationships in order to solve real-world mathematical problems.

IM focuses on the Standards for Mathematical Practice to build a climate that engages students in the exploration of mathematics. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are habits of mind applied throughout the course so that students see mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Through this course, students will—

  • Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative rational numbers.
  • Create and interpret numerical and algebraic expressions and equations in one variable.
  • Develop understanding of proportionality through the use of linear equations and systems of equations to solve and graph single- and multi-step real-world and mathematical problems.
  • Reason about geometric relationships among two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures.
  • Compare two data distributions and generate data sets by random sampling.
  • Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

TOPICS OF STUDY: 

  • Rational Numbers and Exponents
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of opera­tions with fractions to rational numbers.
    • Develop understanding of irrational numbers by using rational approximations.
    • Develop understanding of radicals and integer exponents.
     
  • Proportionality and Linear Relationships
    • Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve problems.
    • Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations.
    • Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
     
  • Statistics and Probability
    • Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population and compare two populations.
    • Develop understanding of probability models.
     
  • Creating, Comparing, and Analyzing Geometric Figures
    • Construct and describe geometric figures through understanding of congruence and similarity.
    • Investigate angle measures, area, surface area, and volume of geometric figures.
     
  Overview and Parent Guides
 
Algebra 1 (MAT2000A/MAT2000B)

HS credit

Algebra 1 is designed to analyze and model real-world phenomena. Exploration of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions form the foundation of the course. Key characteristics and representations of functions—graphic, numeric, symbolic, and verbal—are analyzed and compared. Students develop fluency in solving equations and inequalities. One- and two-variable data sets are interpreted using mathematical models.  

Algebra 1 focuses on the Standards for Mathematical Practice to build a climate that engages students in the exploration of mathematics. The Standards of Mathematical Practice are habits of mind applied throughout the course so that students see mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Through this course, students will do the following: 

  • Develop fluency and master writing, interpreting, and translating between various forms of linear equations and inequalities in one variable, and using them to solve problems.
  • Solve simple exponential equations that rely only on the application of the laws of exponents.
  • Interpret functions (graphically, numerically, symbolically, verbally), translate between representations, and understand the limitations of various representations.
  • Use regression techniques to describe approximately linear relationships between quantities and look at residuals to analyze the goodness of fit and use more formal means of assessing how a model fits data.
  • Compare the key characteristics of quadratic functions to those of linear and exponential functions and select from among these functions to model phenomena.
  • Explore more specialized functions—absolute value, step, and those that are piecewise-defined and select from among these models to model phenomena and solve problems.
TOPICS OF STUDY:
  • Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations
    • Linear Equations in One Variable
    • Linear Inequalities in One Variable
    • Exponential Equations in One Variable
  • Linear and Exponential Relationships
    • Characteristics of Functions
    • Constructing and Comparing Linear and Exponential Functions
    • Solving Systems of Equations and Inequalities in Two Variables
  • Descriptive Statistics
    • Analyzing Data Representations
  • Quadratic Relationships
    • Quadratic Functions
    • Equations in Two Variables
    • Solving Quadratic Equations
  • Generalizing Function Properties
    • Function Families
Overview and Parent Guides
Honors Geometry (MAT2004A/MAT2004B)
Math 180 Course 1 (MAT1010)
 
 

MULTIMEDIA LITERACY

The LCL! course series is of high interest; allows for ease of differentiation; and addresses the visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learner. The LCL! strand focus is on increasing literacy in both written and visual texts, authentic use of vocabulary, improving collaboration skills, building confidence and motivation, and providing opportunities for higher-level thinking.
Lights, Camera, Literacy! (LCL!) (ENG1024 and ENG1025)

This course increases literacy in both written and visual text, improves collaboration skills, builds confidence and motivation, and provides opportunities for high-level thinking via specific strategies. Students transfer their skills as viewers of film to skills on the written page, as well as learn how to read visual text and create effective visual communications.

The course focuses on all three areas of the MCPS Moving Image Education—integrating, deconstructing, and creating the moving image. Students transfer reading skills.

Lights, Camera, Film Literacy! (LCFL!) (ENG1023)

This course offers a study of film and film history as the core for teaching more advanced literacy skills. Students learn the physics and history of motion pictures, as well as how to apply filmmaking techniques to their own visual communications.

Students read one novel as well as shorter written text selections and screenplays. The eight units include How Movies Got their Start; Silent Narrative Films; Early Talkies; Early Color; Genre Classics: The Golden Age of Hollywood; Classic Adaptations: The Golden Age of Hollywood and Beyond; Documentaries; Animation; and The Business of Film and Film Festivals. (Completion of Lights Camera, Literacy! is not required.)

Lights, Camera, Media Literacy! (LCML!) (ENG1027)

This course offers a study of media, its history, and basic related physics concepts as the core for teaching even more advanced literacy skills. Lights, Camera, Media Literacy! presents a timeline of media with focus on the history and physics of communication from the earliest times via storytelling by troubadours and griots to today’s mass media world. The units include Storytelling; The Printing Press; Newspapers & Print Advertising; Photography & Film; Radio; Television; Computers and the Internet; and Media & Our World. Students develop related multimedia projects within each of these units. (Completion of Lights Camera, Literacy! or Lights, Camera, Film Literacy! is not required.)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The middle school physical education program focuses on health-related fitness, movement skills and concepts, and personal and social responsibility. Each physical education unit challenges students to better understand the benefits   of physical activity toward fitness, fundamentals of efficient movement in physical activity and sport, and the essentials of responsibility in a movement setting. The learning tasks in physical education emphasize and teach problem-solving and decision-making skills. Students participate in games and activities that promote fitness, develop tactical awareness, and build social qualities.  Physical Education aligns with Be Well 365 emphasizing lifelong positive health-related attitudes and behaviors that promote self-reliance and self-regulation.

PE Grade 7 (HPE1004)

By the end of Grade 7, students should know and be able to do the following:

HEALTH-RELATED FITNESS

  • Apply exercise principles to the health-related fitness components to develop and modify a personal fitness plan.
  • Calculate and apply methods for measurement of target heart rate and healthy fitness zone.
  • Compare the relationship between nutrition and physical activity.

MOVEMENT SKILLS AND CONCEPTS

  • Apply basic movement concepts related to defense and offense in personal development and tactical games activities.
  • Design and demonstrate creative skill combinations.
  • Develop and modify a personal movement (practice) plan.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

  • Identify conflict-resolution skills and negotiation tactics to promote a healthy physical activity setting.
  • Perform tasks effectively with others in physical activity settings.
  • Apply effective time-management strategies to improve movement skills and fitness levels.

Investigations in Science 7 Course Overview (SCI1003)

In Investigations in Science 7,  students will experience an interdisciplinary approach to science content, exploring all two of the three domains of science (Life Sciences & Earth Science) through hands-on explorations, productive discourse, and purposeful reading and writing.  The curriculum is problem/project-based where students apply their understanding of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to propose solutions to real world phenomenon/problems.  

Unit Title Content Focus
1

Cellular Structure and Processes


Unit Driving Question(s):

How do the structures of organisms enable life’s functions?  How do organisms grow and develop?  How do organisms obtain and use the matter and energy they need to live and grow?  How do food and fuel provide energy?  If energy is conserved, why do people say it is produced or used?  

Performance Expectations: 

MS-LS1-1, MS-LS1-2, MS-LS1-4, MS-LS1-5, MS-LS1-6, MS-LS1-7

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will research a process for growing plants without the use of soil called hydroponics. Students will investigate a variety of different systems and growing mediums for raising plants and will analyze such variables as growth rate and food production. Students will learn that plants grown using this method take in oxygen and nutrients at a quicker pace and use less energy to absorb them.  Plants will be used to introduce the structure and function of living organisms, and students will learn about the characteristics of living things, parts of the cell, and cellular processes.  Students will also learn what materials are required by living things, how the materials are delivered, and how these materials sustain life.

2

Matter and Energy Flow in Organism



Unit Driving Question(s):

How do the structures of organisms enable life’s functions?  How do organisms obtain and use the matter and energy they need to live and grow?  How do the systems of the human body function and perform basic life processes?  How do body systems work together as a cohesive unit to make life possible?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2, MS-ETS1-3, MS-LS1-3, MS-LS1-7, MS-LS1-8

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will study the body systems of organisms and explore how the interactions of those systems affect overall functions.  Students will learn about the levels of organization within an organism and the contribution cells provide a system as the basic building blocks of life. Students will explore how matter and energy are  processed by organisms to build, maintain, and repair themselves.  Students will relate structure and function of body systems to nutritional requirements and disease prevention. 

3

Inheritance and Variation of Traits

Unit Driving Question(s):

How do organisms grow and develop?  How do organisms reproduce, (sexually or asexually) and transfer their genetic information to their offspring? What characteristic behaviors do animals perform that increase the odds of reproduction?  How are the characteristics of one generation related to the previous generation?  How does genetic variation among organisms affect survival and reproduction?  Why do individuals of the same species vary in how they look, function, and behave?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-LS1-4, MS-LS3-1, MS-LS3-2, MS-LS4-5

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will study the principles of heredity and genetics.  They will learn how organisms reproduce and transfer their genetic information to their offspring. Students will study how characteristics get passed on from generation to generation and research several genetic disorders that affect human offspring.  Students will use biotechnical processes to explore the genetic characteristics of organisms.  Students will conduct a DNA extraction and a microarray will be performed as a way of checking the genotypes of the offspring.

4

Earth’s History and Evolution


Unit Driving Question(s):

How do people reconstruct and date events in Earth’s planetary history?  What evidence shows that different species are related?  How do Earth’s major systems interact?  How does genetic variation among organisms affect survival and reproduction?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ESS1-4, MS-ESS2-2, MS-LS4-2, MS-LS4-3, MS-LS4-4, MS-LS4-5, MS-LS4-6, MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will study Earth’s history, geological time, and explore how organisms have evolved.  Students will examine the fossil record and construct explanations from mass extinctions.  Students will explore the concepts of natural selection and adaptation and will learn that traits of an organism can change as a result of environmental conditions or a need for survival.  Students will explore the similarities between organisms and use biotechnical processes, such as DNA fingerprinting, as means of identification. 


LITERACY

Digital Literacy 1 (ENG 1030)

The Digital Literacy 1 curriculum focuses on developing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing in a 21st-century approach. Working through a problem-based process, students learn to define real-world problems of interest, research the causes of those problems using real-time global texts, and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will advance their understanding of comprehension, analysis, and evaluation of text as well as vocabulary acquisition through reading complex informational and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will collaborate regularly through research and solution phases of their investigations. Students’ curiosity and motivation will engage them in their investigations while learning and refining the processes that will enrich all other courses and prepare them for college and career projects.

Digital Literacy 2 (ENG 1031)

The Digital Literacy 2 curriculum focuses on increasing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing through an integrated approach. By participating in a problem-based process, students learn to define, analyze, and evaluate real-world problems of interest related to standards-based curriculum topics. Students will use research skills to investigate problems using real-time global texts and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will participate in sustained inquiry, analysis, and evaluation of text through reading complex informational, expository, and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will hone their communication, collaboration, research, and problem-solving skills and learn to give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products during complex tasks. Digital Literacy creates authentic work for students to engage in by allowing for presentation of their solutions beyond the walls of the classroom.

Challenging Problem or Question

SEMESTER 1: HUMANITIES
SEMESTER 2: STEM

Digital Literacy 3 (ENG 1032)

The Digital Literacy 3 curriculum focuses on increasing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing through an integrated approach. Students will be introduced to a variety of social issues from various perspectives, examine the history of social movements and the impact on social and economic justice, explore their identity, and understand the ways in which communities can respond to these complex issues. Students will explore social justice terminology in order to better advocate for a socially just society. They will have multiple opportunities to participate in book clubs, where they will interact with classmates to analyze social justice texts. Students will participate in sustained inquiry, analysis, and evaluation of text through reading complex informational, expository, and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will use research skills to investigate a contemporary social issue using real-time global texts and then create solutions to address the issue at the individual and/or systemic level.

MS Academic Literacy (ENG 1029)

READING

Read 180 (ENG1017)

READ 180 is an intensive reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of students whose reading achievement is below the proficient level. The program directly addresses individual needs through adaptive and instructional software, high-interest reading materials, and direct instruction in reading and writing skills. Students rotate among a small group, teacher-directed lessons, a computer station for reinforcement and practice, and an independent reading center where students read books at their reading level. The program is designed to rapidly accelerate student achievement with the goal of bringing students to grade level.

Historical Inquiry in World Studies 7 (SOC1004)
Historical Inquiry into Global Humanities 7 (SOC1010)

 
Unit 1:  Students use their social studies literacy skills to investigate the geography of Latin America  and the consequences of geographic modifications. Students will explore life in Latin America at the height of the Aztec and Inca Empire learning how modifications to their environment were essential to their success. Additionally, students will be able investigate and research life in Latin America today and the impact economic choices have had on the environment of their respective region. Unit Question: Why do people modify their environment?

Unit 2:  Students use their social studies literacy skills to evaluate the structures and functions of an evolving political system starting at the height of the Roman Empire, ending with the formation of individual nation states in Europe.  By studying the changing political systems of Europe from feudalism to the emergence of nation-states, students learn how the source of power in the modern age became centralized and dependent on a growing middle class. At the end of the unit students will be able to answer the Unit Question: How is a political system impacted when a society changes?

Unit 3: Students use their social studies literacy skills to investigate the culture of Medieval African societies  and modern day Africa. Students gain an understanding of how culture impacts a society and the decisions made by a society in regards to their political and economic structures. By investigating the culture of African societies,  students will begin to examine their own culture to better understand how the beliefs, values and traditions held by cultural groups impact modern day social and political structures. At the end of the unit students will be able to answer the Unit Question: How do interactions among diverse cultures impact a society?

Unit 4: Students use their social studies literacy skills to investigate the shift to a global market place after the Middle Ages by analyzing the benefits and costs of a world connected by trade. Students end the unit by shifting from how a global market changed the world in 1450-1750 to how it is changing the world today and the institutions put into place to support the global economic and political foundations. Unit Question: How does globalization impact the world?

WORLD LANGUAGES

Students are encouraged to pursue World Language offerings as early as possible in middle school. The world languages available in middle schools are Chinese, French, Italian, Japanese, Spanish, and Spanish for Spanish Speakers. Offerings vary by school. The world language courses are high school credit-bearing courses. Please see page 4 for more information about high school credit in middle school. Course numbers are language and level dependent.

Level 1A/1B
HS credit

Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret basic information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and basic grammatical structures are taught within the context of these familiar topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

NOTE: Levels 1A and 1B may be offered in middle school as full-year courses. In that case, students must pass the full year of 1A and the full year of 1B in order to earn one high school credit.

Level 2A/2B
HS credit

Students expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

Level 3A/B
HS credit

Students continue to expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about a variety of familiar topics. They interpret detailed information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and more complex grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1 A/B (WLG2141A/B)
HS credit Spanish for Spanish Speakers 2 A/B (WLG2142A/B)
HS credit

Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1 A/B and Spanish for Spanish Speakers 2 A/B are offered at selected middle schools. Spanish for Spanish Speakers provides language instruction for students with proficiency in Spanish, either because it is their first language or it is spoken extensively in their home. Each course integrates history, culture, language, and connections related to the Spanish-speaking world.

World Language Immersion

Students who have completed an MCPS elementary school immersion program may join the immersion programs at the middle school level. Students who did not participate in the elementary program may test into an immersion program, if there is space available. The following middle schools offer these courses: Silver Spring International Middle School (Spanish/French), Westland Middle School (Spanish), Gaithersburg Middle School (French) and Hoover Middle School (Chinese).

The immersion language courses are high school creditbearing courses. Please see page 4 for more information about high school credit it middle school.

Grades 6–8 French (WLG2053 through  WLG2055)
HS credit

A two-period program of instruction enables students to enhance their language development through one period of language class and one period of the MCPS social studies curriculum in French.

Grade 6–8 Spanish (WLG2147 through WLG2149)
HS credit

A two-period program of instruction enables students in Grades 6 and 7 to enhance their language development through one period of language class and one period of the MCPS social studies curriculum in Spanish. In Grade 8, students continue with one period of language instruction.

Grade 6 Chinese (WLG 2034 through WLG 2036)
HS credit

This one-period course continues to build on the language skills acquired in the elementary school immersion program. Students transition into the regular MCPS Chinese 2 course in Grade 7.