Middle School Academics

Grade 6 Academics

Grade 6 STEM Electives

 

STEM electives in middle school are important building blocks in the preparation of all students for demands of college, careers, and the rapidly changing 21st century workforce.  STEM courses teach students to apply mathematics, science, and technical knowledge to innovate and solve problems.  MCPS is committed to providing a well-rounded education for middle school students that includes an engaging, hands-on experience with computational learning.  Middle school STEM electives teach students computational and technological literacy through coding, computer science, engineering, robotics, and other technology and design-related experiences.  This program promotes creative problem solving and an exploration of multiple STEM related fields of study and careers.

 

Grade 6 MS Coding, Engineering, and Robotics Design STEM Electives*

MP

MP

Coding and Game Development (ITC2069)
Students will learn the elements of good game design and the different game genres as well as basic video game coding concepts including racing, platform, launching, and more.  Students will apply computational thinking to their game designs.  Students will be introduced to various programming languages.

Introduction to Technology & Engineering (ENR1022)

Students are introduced to technological systems and learn and apply the Engineering Design Process to a variety of challenges. Students are introduced to Computer Aided Design using TinkerCAD.

MP

MP

Engineering Design & Modeling (ENR1023)

Students utilize the Engineering Design Process and technical skills of isometric sketching, multiview drawing, and Computer Aided Design using TinkerCAD to design solutions to engineering challenges.

Robotic Design 6 (ITC2068)

Students will apply coding and programming skills and problem-solving to make physical models respond to commands. Students will collaborate, communicate, think computationally, program, debug and create models while learning to solve open-ended, real-life problems. 

*Schools may offer 1 to 4 of these quarter long courses 


Other Grade 6 Electives

Grade 6 Technology and Design (ENR1020)

Information and Communication Technology Grade 6 (ITC1004)


Grade 6 English (ENG1009)
Grade 6 Adv English (ENG1010)

The goal of the Secondary English Language Arts program is to create literate, thoughtful communicators, capable of controlling language effectively as they negotiate an increasingly complex and information-rich world. As students leave elementary school, they encounter new academic expectations such as analyzing varied and complex texts, developing arguments, synthesizing information from multiple sources, examining different perspectives, and engaging in self-reflection. Students work to acquire specific skills and strategies in reading literature, reading informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language.

MS Academic Literacy (ENG1029)

This course involves implementation of iLit, a reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of struggling readers through differentiated instruction, computer adaptive instruction, background-knowledge-building videos, high-interest literature, and explicit instruction in reading, writing, and vocabulary skills.

Digital Literacy 1 (ENG1030)

The Digital Literacy 1 curriculum focuses on developing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing in a 21st-century approach. Working through a problem-based process, students learn to define real-world problems of interest, research the causes of those problems using real-time global texts, and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will advance their understanding of comprehension, analysis, and evaluation of text as well as vocabulary acquisition through reading complex informational and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will collaborate regularly through research and solution phases of their investigations. Students' curiosity and motivation will engage them in their investigations while learning and refining the processes that will enrich all other courses and prepare them for college and career projects.

The English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program provides high-quality English language development instruction aligned to grade-level content standards in English Language Arts. These courses focus on helping students develop the academic language proficiency needed to be able to learn content knowledge, skills, and processes and effectively use language to communicate proficiently in mainstream courses.
These courses are designed for the rapid mastery of the English language, focusing on reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. ESOL courses usually begin with extensive listening and speaking practice, building on auditory and oral skills, and support the development of reading and writing. These courses provide an explanation of grammat- ical structures of the English language, enabling students to progress from a basic under- standing of English words and verb tenses to a more comprehensive grasp of various formal and informal styles to prepare them for grade-level mainstream English courses. ESOL classes may also include an orientation to the customs and culture of the diverse population in the United States.  All ESOL courses are aligned to the grade-level standards and curriculum in Grades 6-8.
 ESOL students will be scheduled into English classes designed to meet their level of academic language proficiency in appropriate ways including sheltered, co-taught, single and double periods. ESOL levels will be aligned to the English Language Proficiency (ELP) levels 1.0-4.4 on the WIDA ACCESS test.

Grade Level 

Course 

New Course Code #

Notes (i.e. HS credit) 

 

Grade 6

English 6 for English Learners (ELs) I

ESL1014

Double Period

English 6 for ELs II

ESL 1017

Double Period

English 6 for ELs III

ESL 1020

Single Period 

 

Grade 7 

English 7 forELs I

ESL1015

Double Period

English 7 for ELs II

ESL 1018

Double Period

English 7 for ELs III

ESL 1021

Single Period

 

Grade 8 

English 8 forELs I

ESL 1016

Double Period

English 8 for ELs II

ESL 1019

Double Period

English 8 for ELs III

ESL 1022

Single Period


Programs

Multidisciplinary Educational Training and Support Program (METS)

Family and Comsumer Sciences (EDU1002, EDU1003)

Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) programs focus on processes and skills that enhance individual, family, and societal well-being. Programs reflect the National Standards for FACS Education and integrate math, science, English, and social studies. A project-based curriculum encourages students to investigate and solve authentic problems. Students learn to use communication and critical-thinking skills as well as current technologies to make informed decisions.

UNIT 1: INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY, AND SOCIETAL NEEDS
UNIT 2: DECISION-MAKING PROCESS
UNIT 3: NUTRITION AND WELLNESS
UNIT 4: PERSONAL FINANCE
UNIT 5: LIVING ENVIRONMENTS
UNIT 6: COLLEGE AND CAREER PLANNING

FINE ARTS

The fine arts are important to every child’s development and play a vital role in providing students with a well-rounded, world class education. Dance, Music, Theatre, and Visual Art promote academic excellence, creative problem-solving, and social emotional learning, which are essential components of college and career readiness. In order to meet the evolving needs of a 21st century learner, the fine arts focus on developing artistic literacy by engaging in the artistic processes (creating, performing/presenting, responding, and connecting) through authentic materials and techniques. The fine arts introduce students to new world views and cultures, help students to value the perspectives of others, and enable students to creatively express a personal viewpoint. Through artistic experiences, students become independent and divergent thinkers, selfmotivated workers, and innovators. All students have access to fine arts programs in middle school. In Grades 6–8, students may specialize in one or more of the fine art forms.

Dance

Middle School Dance 1 (ART1064)

Students with no previous dance experience should begin at Level 1 in the dance sequence. This beginning course provides a survey of dance styles and elements

General Music

General Music (ART1030)

In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn about music and instruments from a variety of world cultures. Students explore various genres of music through singing, performing on instruments, and creating music. World Beat Music Grade 6 is open to all sixth grade students interested in deepening their understanding and application of musical concepts and historical study.

Piano (ART1048)

Students acquire basic piano technique and learn to read written music notation. Students develop effective practice habits so they will be able to progress independently. Check with your child’s counselor to see if this is offered at your school.

Guitar (ART1043)

Students learn beginning guitar techniques, including selected major, minor, and seventh chords; basic finger picks and strums; and tuning technique. Students develop effective practice habits so they will be able to progress independently. Check with your child’s counselor to see if this is offered at your school.

Choral Music

MS Chorus 1 (ART1040)

Students will create, perform, and respond to music in a variety of styles/genres. Students will develop the fundamentals of proper vocal technique and choral singing in relation to posture, breath control, tone, intonation, diction, blending, singing in harmony, music literacy, and sight-singing. Students will primarily sing state level 2 music. There will likely be a minimum of two school concerts and students are expected to participate in all performances. This course is open to all students, regardless of music background.

MS Chorus 2 (ART1041)

Students will create, perform, and respond to music in a variety of styles/genres. Students will continue to develop the fundamentals of proper vocal technique and choral singing in relation to posture, breath control, tone, intonation, diction, blending, singing in harmony, music literacy, and sight-singing. Students will primarily sing state level 2-3 music. There will likely be a minimum of two school concerts as well as the opportunity to participate in other festivals/performances and students are expected to participate in all performances. An audition and/or a prerequisite of MS Chorus 1 may be required.

MS Chorus 3 (ART1042)

Students will create, perform, and respond to music in a variety of styles/genres. Students will continue to develop proper vocal technique and choral singing in relation to posture, breath control, tone, intonation, diction, blending, singing in harmony, music literacy, and sight-singing in multiple keys and parts. Students will primarily sing state level 3 music. There will likely be a minimum of two school concerts as well as the opportunity to participate in other festivals/performances and students are expected to participate in all performances. An audition and/or a prerequisite of MS Chorus 1 and/or 2 may be required.

Instrumental Music

Beginning Band (ART1037), Beginning Strings (ART1038)

This course is for students with no prior instrumental music experience. Students prepare for participation in performing ensembles and develop technical skills necessary to perform Grade 1 Level music, a performance level established by the National Association for Music Education and not a reference to first grade. Basic instrumental skills are developed by performing a variety of music. Students are taught the elements of musical form, terms and symbols, tone production, instrument care and maintenance, and the importance of consistent practice habits. Cultural context of the music and its historical significance as they relate to performance is studied. Students may attend live performances and perform in public. Students may be concurrently enrolled with 7892, 6845, 6815, and Middle School Band I (6880) or Orchestra I (6800) if necessary to run the course.

Middle School Band I (ART1033), Orchestra I (ART1045)

Students refine skills learned from their elementary Grade 4 and 5 instrumental music programs or in Middle School Beginning Band, String, or Wind and Percussion, and develop more advanced performance techniques. The development of technical skills necessary to perform Grade 1 to Grade 2 Level music is stressed. Emphasis is placed on developing formal rehearsal decorum, following a conductor, and developing pitch and rhythmic security in preparation for performing an independent part in the traditional band or orchestra ensemble. Students also learn melodic form and construction as they examine and perform more complex folk melodies and melodies from master composers. Students discuss the social and intellectual influences that affected the creation of the music they are studying. They begin to develop aesthetic criteria for measuring the quality of instrumental performance. Students may attend live performances and perform in public.

Prerequisite: Attainment of outcomes for Beginning Band, String, or Wind/Percussion Instruments in Grades 4–5 or 6–8.

Middle School Band II (ART1034), Orchestra II (ART1046)

Students develop and refine their technical skills in order to perform music at the Grade 2 Level of difficulty. Emphasis is placed on developing formal rehearsal decorum, following a conductor and developing pitch and rhythmic security in preparation for performing an independent part in the traditional band or orchestra ensemble. Students learn the social, cultural, and intellectual influences reflected in the musical works they are studying and discuss performance styles and musical forms of corresponding historical periods. The study of music theory includes performance and recognition of major scales, diatonic and chromatic intervals, and simple melodic dictation. The critical listening skills that are developed as a result of preparation for instrumental performance are used to help the student formulate criteria for effectively evaluating his/her own performance as well as the performance of others. This band or orchestra represents middle schools at public performances.

Prerequisite: Attainment of outcomes for Middle School Band I or Orchestra I. Students may also audition to qualify for this course. This course may be taken for more than one year.

Middle School Band III (ART1035), Orchestra III (ART1047)

Students distinguish between abstract and programmatic music and learn and discuss the social, intellectual, and historical influences on each. Students develop and refine their technical skills in order to perform music at the Grade 2 to Grade 3 Level of difficulty. In addition, students perform and historically categorize transcriptions of a variety of composers. This band or orchestra represents middle schools at public performances.

Prerequisite: Attainment of outcomes for Middle School Band II or Orchestra II. Students may also audition to qualify for this course. This course may be taken for multiple years.

Theatre

Middle School Theatre 1 (ART1061)

Students in Grades 6, 7, or 8 with no previous theatre experience should begin at Level 1 in the curricular sequence. In this beginning level course, students will explore how the theater is a space that both creates and challenges COMMUNITY. Theatre artists create an ensemble amongst themselves which functions as a safe space for risk-taking and creating. A sustained investigation of COMMUNITY in this intermediate level course engages students to study a variety of dramatic works, participate in the creation and enhancement of ensemble, and question the role of theatre within their COMMUNITY.

Visual Art

Middle School Art 1

Students will be provided multiple and varied opportunities explore IDENTITY and the many ways this theme can be represented through visual art. Students will develop a fundamental understanding of ideation, media techniques, formal qualities, and compositional devices. Students in Grade 6, Grade 7, and Grade 8 with no previous art experience in middle school should begin at Level 1 in the visual art sequence.

  • Middle School Studio Art 1 (ART1024): Students will explore a variety of traditional student media and techniques including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and crafts to create artworks.
  • Middle School Digital Art and Photography 1 (ART1018): Students will utilize raster-based digital media and/or digital photography to create artworks.
Innovation Art Design Pathway

These year-long courses integrate visual art and computational thinking. By the end of the course, students will have mastered both the Maryland Technology Education Standards and the National Visual Art Standards. Students will investigate real-world problems, and then seek to design and create meaningful solutions via computational thinking and the artistic process.

  • Middle School Innovative Art & Design 1 (ART1008)

Comprehensive Health Education in Grade 6 (HPE1000)

Comprehensive Health Education promotes positive health- related attitudes and behaviors that support self-reliance and self-regulation, while developing health literacy skills and lifelong wellness. The health literacy skills emphasized throughout the program include analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision making, goal-setting, self-management, and advocacy.
Beginning in the 2018-2019 school year, the Family Life and Human Sexuality unit will include age-appropriate instruction on the meaning of “consent” and respect for personal boundaries in every grade in which the curriculum is taught. Health Education aligns with Be Well 365 by emphasizing lifelong positive health-related attitudes and behaviors that promote self-reliance and self-regulation for all students.

Key Concepts

Grade 6 Mathematics (MAT1005)    

Math 6 extends students’ understanding of whole number and fraction concepts developed throughout the elementary grades. Instruction at this level will focus on four areas: (1) connecting ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division and using concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems; (2) completing understanding of division of fractions and extending the notion of number to the system of rational numbers, which includes negative numbers; (3) writing, interpreting, and using expressions and equations; and (4) developing understanding of statistical thinking.

The content of Math 6 focuses on the Standards for Mathematical Practice to build a climate that engages students in the exploration of mathematics. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are habits of mind applied throughout the course so that students see mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Through this course, students will do the following:

  •  Reason about multiplication and division to solve ratio and rate problems about quantities. 
  •  Use the meaning of fractions, the meanings of multiplication and division, and the relationship between multiplication and division to understand and explain why the procedures for dividing fractions make sense. 
  •  Understand the use of variables in mathematical expressions. 
  •  Build on and reinforce the understanding of number, to develop the ability to think statistically.  
  •  Reason about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.  

TOPICS OF STUDY:

  • Ratios and Proportional Relationships
    • Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
  • The Number System
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of multi­plication and division to divide fractions by fractions.
    • Multiply and divide multi-digit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of num­bers to the system of rational numbers.
  • Expressions and Equations
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of arith­metic to algebraic expressions.
    • Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
    • Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.
  • Geometry
    • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involv­ing area, surface area, and volume.  
     Overview and Parent Guides
Applied Investigations into Mathematics 6 (MAT1003)

Investigations into Mathematics (IM) extends students’ understanding of mathematical concepts developed in Mathematics 6 and accelerates the pace of instruction to prepare for Algebra 1. This course compacts all of the Grade 7 Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and much of the Grade 8 CCSS into a single year. Students who successfully complete IM are prepared for Algebra 1 in Grade 8. The remaining Grade 8 CCSS are compacted into the Algebra 1 course. Instruction for IM will focus on four critical areas: (1) developing a unified understanding of number, recognizing fractions, decimals (including both those that have a finite or a repeating decimal representation), and percents as different representations of rational numbers; (2) using linear equations and systems of linear equations to represent, analyze, and solve a variety of problems; (3) comparing two data distributions and reasoning about differences between populations; and (4) analyzing geometric relationships in order to solve real-world mathematical problems.

IM focuses on the Standards for Mathematical Practice to build a climate that engages students in the exploration of mathematics. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are habits of mind applied throughout the course so that students see mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Through this course, students will—

  • Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative rational numbers.
  • Create and interpret numerical and algebraic expressions and equations in one variable.
  • Develop understanding of proportionality through the use of linear equations and systems of equations to solve and graph single- and multi-step real-world and mathematical problems.
  • Reason about geometric relationships among two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures.
  • Compare two data distributions and generate data sets by random sampling.
  • Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

TOPICS OF STUDY:

  • Rational Numbers and Exponents
    • Apply and extend previous understandings of opera­tions with fractions to rational numbers.
    • Develop understanding of irrational numbers by using rational approximations.
    • Develop understanding of radicals and integer exponents.
     
  • Proportionality and Linear Relationships
    • Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve problems.
    • Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations.
    • Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
     
  • Statistics and Probability
    • Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population and compare two populations.
    • Develop understanding of probability models.
     
  • Creating, Comparing, and Analyzing Geometric Figures
    • Construct and describe geometric figures through understanding of congruence and similarity.
    • Investigate angle measures, area, surface area, and volume of geometric figures.
     
Overview and Parent Guides   
Accelerated Math 6+ (MAT1015)

The Accelerated Math 6 Plus (AMP 6+) course begins with a study of area and surface area concepts. This work sets the tone for later units that use area models for arithmetic using rational numbers. Next, students begin study of ratios, rates, and percentages with an introduction using representations such as number line diagrams, tape diagrams, and tables. Student understanding of these concepts expands by exploring fraction and decimal representations of rational numbers. They explore sums, differences, products, and quotients using intuitive methods and efficient algorithms. Next, students are introduced to equations and expressions including finding solutions for linear equations in one variable and basic equations involving exponents. Student understanding of ratios and rates combined with a basic understanding of equations leads students to study proportional relationships with special emphasis on circumference and area of a circle as an example and non-example of proportional relationships. This is followed by looking at percentage concepts and applications such as sales tax, tipping, and markup. They learn about rational numbers less than zero expanding their understanding of arithmetic to negative numbers. A brief study of data and statistics concludes the new concepts in the course. The last unit offers students an optional opportunity to synthesize their learning from the year using a number of different applications.

 

TOPICS OF STUDY:

 

·         Areas

o    Find areas of polygons by decomposing, rearranging, and composing shapes. 

o    Understand and use the terms “base” and “height,” and find areas of parallelograms and triangles. 

o    Approximate areas of non-polygonal regions by polygonal regions. 

o    Represent polyhedra with nets and find their surface areas.

·         Ratios, Rates, and Percentages

o    Understand and use the terms related to ratios, rates, and percentages.

o    Recognize when two ratios are or are not equivalent and that equivalent ratios have equal unit rates.

o    Represent ratios as expressions, and represent equivalent ratios with double number line diagrams, tape diagrams, and tables. 

o    Represent percentages with tables, tape diagrams, and double number line diagrams, and as expressions. 

o    Use these terms and representations in reasoning about situations involving unit price, constant speed, measurement conversion, color mixtures, and recipes.

·         Fractions and Decimals

o    Examine how the relative sizes of numerator and denominator affect the size of their quotient when numerator or denominator (or both) is a fraction. 

o    Compute quotients of fractions. 

o    Solve problems involving lengths and areas of figures with fractional side lengths and extend the formula for the volume of a right rectangular prism to prisms with fractional edge lengths and use it to solve problems. 

o    Describe a situation that a multiplication or division equation or expression with a fraction could represent.

o    Compute sums, differences, products, and quotients of multi-digit whole numbers and decimals, using efficient algorithms. 

o    Use calculations with whole numbers and decimals to solve problems set in real-world contexts.

·         Equations and Expressions

o    Understand and use the terms “variable,” “coefficient,” “solution,” “equivalent expressions,” “exponent,” “independent variable,” and “dependent variable.” 

o    Work with expressions that have positive whole-number exponents and whole-number, fraction, or variable bases, using properties of exponents strategically to evaluate these expressions, given a value for the variable. 

o    Use these terms and representations (including expressions with two variables) in reasoning about real-world and geometrical situations, understanding that some values of variables may not make sense in a given context. 

o    Represent collections of equivalent ratios as equations and use and make connections between tables, graphs, and linear equations that represent the same relationships.

·         Proportional Relationships

o    Understand and use the terms “proportional,” “constant of proportionality,” and “proportional relationship,” and recognize when a relationship is or is not proportional. 

o    Represent proportional relationships with tables, equations, and graphs. 

o    Use these terms and representations in reasoning about situations that involve constant speed, unit pricing, and measurement conversions. 

o    Special focus is given to circumference and area of circles as examples of proportional and non-proportional relationships, respectively. Students informally derive the formulas for circumference and area of a circle and are introduced to the value pi.

·         Percentage Increase and Decrease

o    Use ratios, scale factors, unit rates (also called constants of proportionality), and proportional relationships to solve multi-step, real-world problems that involve fractions and percentages. 

o    Understand and use the terms “repeating decimal,” “terminating decimal,” “percent increase,” “percent decrease,” “percent error,” and “measurement error.”

o    Represent amounts and corresponding percent rates with double number line diagrams and tables. 

o    Use these terms and representations in reasoning about situations involving sales taxes, tips, markdowns, markups, sales commissions, interest, depreciation, and scaling a picture. 

o    Use equations to represent proportional relationships in which the constant of proportionality arises from a percentage, for example, the relationship between price paid and amount of sales tax paid.

·         Rational Numbers

o    Interpret signed numbers in contexts (e.g., temperature, elevation, deposit and withdrawal, position, direction, speed and velocity, percent change) together with their sums, differences, products, and quotients. 

o    Understand and use the terms “positive number,” “negative number,” “rational number,” “opposite,” “sign,” “absolute value,” “less than,” “greater than,” and the corresponding symbols. 

o    Plot points with signed rational number coordinates on the number line, and recognize and use the connection between relative position of two points on the number line and inequalities involving the coordinates of the points. 

o    Understand and use absolute value notation, understanding that the absolute value of a number as its distance from zero on the number line.

o    Use tables and number line diagrams to represent sums and differences of signed numbers or changes in quantities represented by signed numbers such as temperature or elevation, becoming more fluent in writing different numerical addition and subtraction equations that express the same relationship. 

o    Compute sums and differences of signed numbers. 

o    Plot pairs of signed number coordinates in the plane, understanding the relationship between the signs of a pair of coordinates and the quadrant of the corresponding point, and use coordinates to calculate horizontal and vertical distances between two points.

·         Data Sets and Distribution

o    Introduced to dot plots and histograms as ways of visualizing data and distributions. 

o    Informally describe the distributions using center and spread before more formally computing mean, median, mean absolute deviation, and interquartile range as ways of quantifying the center and variability. 

o    Consider what they can do when they do not have access to all of the necessary data. 

o    Ways to get samples, why using random processes is important, and how information from samples can be variable are all introduced.

Algebra 1 (MAT2000A/MAT2000B)
Math 180 Course 1 (MAT1010)
 

MULTIMEDIA LITERACY

The LCL! course series is of high interest; allows for ease of differentiation; and addresses the visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learner. The LCL! strand focus is on increasing literacy in both written and visual texts, authentic use of vocabulary, improving collaboration skills, building confidence and motivation, and providing opportunities for higher-level thinking.
Lights, Camera, Literacy! (LCL!) (ENG1024 and ENG1025)

This course increases literacy in both written and visual text, improves collaboration skills, builds confidence and motivation, and provides opportunities for high-level thinking via specific strategies. Students transfer their skills as viewers of film to skills on the written page, as well as learn how to read visual text and create effective visual communications.

The course focuses on all three areas of the MCPS Moving Image Education—integrating, deconstructing, and creating the moving image. Students transfer reading skills.

Lights, Camera, Film Literacy! (LCFL!) (ENG1023)

This course offers a study of film and film history as the core for teaching more advanced literacy skills. Students learn the physics and history of motion pictures, as well as how to apply filmmaking techniques to their own visual communications.

Students read one novel as well as shorter written text selections and screenplays. The eight units include How Movies Got their Start; Silent Narrative Films; Early Talkies; Early Color; Genre Classics: The Golden Age of Hollywood; Classic Adaptations: The Golden Age of Hollywood and Beyond; Documentaries; Animation; and The Business of Film and Film Festivals. (Completion of Lights Camera, Literacy! is not required.)

Lights, Camera, Media Literacy! (LCML!) (ENG1027)

This course offers a study of media, its history, and basic related physics concepts as the core for teaching even more advanced literacy skills. Lights, Camera, Media Literacy! presents a timeline of media with focus on the history and physics of communication from the earliest times via storytelling by troubadours and griots to today’s mass media world. The units include Storytelling; The Printing Press; Newspapers & Print Advertising; Photography & Film; Radio; Television; Computers and the Internet; and Media & Our World. Students develop related multimedia projects within each of these units. (Completion of Lights Camera, Literacy! or Lights, Camera, Film Literacy! is not required.)

The Grade 6 MCPS Outdoor Environmental Education Program, known as “Outdoor Ed,” provides students with a three-day residential experience focused on the driving question, “How do our actions and choices impact the health of the watershed?”  Using relevant, engaging, and interdisciplinary lessons, students explore the local ecosystem and their role in it. The natural world is both classroom and laboratory for teaching and learning at Outdoor Ed - literacy and mathematics are authentically integrated. The core lessons of this Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience include:

  • field experiences where scientific practices are used to investigate the environment, and where components of the MCPS Grade 6 curriculum  are learned in a real-world setting. Environmental science lessons focus on the local watershed that include water-quality analysis of the local stream, use of a simulation to study population dynamics, and investigation of the impact of humans on the environment.
  • engaging lessons created to foster inquiry, collaboration, critical thinking, and problem solving.
  • structured and unstructured opportunities for building positive interpersonal relationships as students learn and practice relationship-building skills with their peers and teachers. Making a new friend is reported by over 90% of students at the conclusion of Outdoor Ed!
  • motivation and opportunity for students to be active stewards of the environment as they investigate ways their choices impact the environment and choose a daily action to improve it. The environmental learning and actions form the environmental Student Service Learning experience, which is an integral part of the Grade 6 science curriculum.

At Outdoor Ed, students live in dormitory-style housing at one of three sites, work collaboratively to take care of the dorms, and serve each other at meals. Teachers from each middle school accompany their students and teach several of the lessons at Outdoor Ed along with the Outdoor Ed coordinators.  A fee is charged for the residential setting of the program, set by the Board of Education; alternative payment options and waivers are available. Speaking volumes about Outdoor Ed, MCPS high schools seniors cite this unique experience among their three most remembered and cherished learning events in their twelve years of education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The middle school physical education program focuses on health-related fitness, movement skills and concepts, and personal and social responsibility. Each physical education unit challenges students to better understand the benefits   of physical activity toward fitness, fundamentals of efficient movement in physical activity and sport, and the essentials of responsibility in a movement setting. The learning tasks in physical education emphasize and teach problem-solving and decision-making skills. Students participate in games and activities that promote fitness, develop tactical awareness, and build social qualities.  Physical Education aligns with Be Well 365 emphasizing lifelong positive health-related attitudes and behaviors that promote self-reliance and self-regulation.

PE Grade 6 (HPE1003)

By the end of Grade 6, students should know and be able to do the following:

HEALTH-RELATED FITNESS

  • Define and compare the health-related fitness components, including aerobic capacity/cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility.
  • Define the exercise principles of overload, specificity, and progression.
  • Develop a personal fitness plan using the Frequency, Intensity, Time, and Type (FITT) formula.
  • Define and calculate target heart rate.

MOVEMENT SKILLS AND CONCEPTS

  • Perform fundamental movement skills essential to physical activity and sport.
  • Demonstrate creative skill combinations, such as tumbling sequences and dances.
  • Create a personal movement (practice) plan.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

  • Perform tasks effectively with others in physical activity settings.
  • Acquire and maintain relationships that develop a sense of community in physical activity settings.
  • Establish and modify personal goals.

Science Curriculum: Middle School

Science Elementary Curriculum

In Montgomery County Public Schools, the goal of the science program is for all students to achieve full scientific literacy through Next Generation Science Standards aligned and phenomenon-based instruction that will prepare them for success in college and career. The MCPS science curriculum was developed as a coherent learning progression from kindergarten through grade 12 where all students experience a rigorous, interdisciplinary approach to science content, exploring science through hands-on explorations, productive discourse, and purposeful reading and writing. Students apply content knowledge through the scientific and engineering practices to solve real world problems and develop the tools that will make them successful lifelong learners.


Grade Course Information

Investigations in Science 6 Course Overview

In Investigations in Science 6,  students will experience an interdisciplinary approach to science content, exploring all three domains of science (Earth/Space, Physical, and Life Sciences) through hands-on explorations, productive discourse, and purposeful reading and writing.  The curriculum is problem/project-based where students apply their understanding of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to propose solutions to real world phenomenon/problems.  Students are awarded 10 SSL hours at the completion of Grade 6 Science for their full participation in SSL activities related to their Outdoor Education experience.

Unit Title Content Focus
1

Matter and Its Interactions

Unit Driving Question(s):

How do particles combine to form the variety of matter one observes and make new substances?  What is energy and what is meant by conservation of energy?  How is energy transferred between objects or systems?  How does one characterize and explain these reactions and make predictions about them?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2, MS PS1-1, MS-PS1-2, MS-PS1-3, MS-PS1-4, MS-PS1-5, MS-PS1-6, MS-PS3-3, MS-PS3-4

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

The world is composed of matter and matter is made up of atoms and molecules that are attracted to each other and in constant motion.  Variations in motion are caused by changes in thermal (heat) energy.  Students will discover that the relationship between temperature and thermal energy depends on the types, states, and amounts of matter.  Students will explore simple chemical reactions that release and absorb energy and will discover that the breaking of certain bonds between atoms in the reactants create new products that conserve mass.  Students will apply their understanding of chemistry to a real-life situation and design a special effects display through the use of chemical properties and reactions.  

2

Ecosystems Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Unit Driving Question(s):

How do organisms interact with the living and nonliving environments to obtain matter and energy?  What happens to ecosystems when the environment changes?   How do matter and energy move through an ecosystem?  What happens to ecosystems when the environment changes?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-LS2-1, MS-LS2-2, MS-LS2-3, MS-LS2-4, MS-LS2-5

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will explore the biodiversity and essential factors of different ecosystems and learn that a population consists of all species that occur together at a given place and time.  Students will investigate populations within food webs and categorize those populations as producers, consumers, and decomposers.  Students will learn that organisms compete for limited resources and that the number of organisms an ecosystem can support depends on the resources available.  Students will explore how competition may limit or generate the growth of populations in specific niches in the ecosystems.  They will use models to demonstrate the flow of matter and energy in an ecosystem.  Students will use this information to create and maintain a habitat for a local species.  

3

Human Impacts on the Environment

Unit Driving Question(s):

How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?  How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?  How do humans change the planet?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2, MS-ESS3-1, MS-ESS3-3MS-ESS3-4, MS-PS1-2

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will discover that natural resources are used by living things in a variety of ways, but how much and in what ways we use those resources affects the footprint of our planet.  Students will learn that our use of fossil fuels has consequences on the environment.  Students will investigate how human activity and use of resources impacts the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere and consider alternative solutions for the products we make and the resources we use.  They will model a solution to a variety of environmental problems created from natural resource use. 

4

Energy and Waves

Unit Driving Question(s):

How is energy transferred and conserved between objects or systems?  What are the characteristic properties and behaviors of waves?  What is light and how can one explain the varied effects that involve light?  What other forms of electromagnetic radiation are there?  How are instruments that transmit and detect waves used to extend human senses?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-PS2-3, MS-PS2-5, MS-PS3-2, MS-PS3-5, MS-PS4-1, MS-PS4-2, MS-PS4-3, MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will discover how alternative energy sources can be used to solve real world problems and design a solution.  They must consider the ideas of electricity, magnetism, electrical energy production, and conversions of different types of energy, in order to debate and choose the best source of alternative energy.  Students will explore the concepts of electricity and magnetism and the relationship between them. They will also investigate electrical energy and conclude it can be generated from a variety of sources and transferred into almost any form of energy.  Students will discover that energy travels in waves and explore how light and sound behave.  Students will use their design-folio to design a solution.

Investigations in Science 7 Course Overview (SCI1003)

In Investigations in Science 7,  students will experience an interdisciplinary approach to science content, exploring all two of the three domains of science (Life Sciences & Earth Science) through hands-on explorations, productive discourse, and purposeful reading and writing.  The curriculum is problem/project-based where students apply their understanding of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to propose solutions to real world phenomenon/problems.  

Unit Title Content Focus
1

Cellular Structure and Processes


Unit Driving Question(s):

How do the structures of organisms enable life’s functions?  How do organisms grow and develop?  How do organisms obtain and use the matter and energy they need to live and grow?  How do food and fuel provide energy?  If energy is conserved, why do people say it is produced or used?  

Performance Expectations: 

MS-LS1-1, MS-LS1-2, MS-LS1-4, MS-LS1-5, MS-LS1-6, MS-LS1-7

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will research a process for growing plants without the use of soil called hydroponics. Students will investigate a variety of different systems and growing mediums for raising plants and will analyze such variables as growth rate and food production. Students will learn that plants grown using this method take in oxygen and nutrients at a quicker pace and use less energy to absorb them.  Plants will be used to introduce the structure and function of living organisms, and students will learn about the characteristics of living things, parts of the cell, and cellular processes.  Students will also learn what materials are required by living things, how the materials are delivered, and how these materials sustain life.

2

Matter and Energy Flow in Organism



Unit Driving Question(s):

How do the structures of organisms enable life’s functions?  How do organisms obtain and use the matter and energy they need to live and grow?  How do the systems of the human body function and perform basic life processes?  How do body systems work together as a cohesive unit to make life possible?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2, MS-ETS1-3, MS-LS1-3, MS-LS1-7, MS-LS1-8

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will study the body systems of organisms and explore how the interactions of those systems affect overall functions.  Students will learn about the levels of organization within an organism and the contribution cells provide a system as the basic building blocks of life. Students will explore how matter and energy are  processed by organisms to build, maintain, and repair themselves.  Students will relate structure and function of body systems to nutritional requirements and disease prevention. 

3

Inheritance and Variation of Traits

Unit Driving Question(s):

How do organisms grow and develop?  How do organisms reproduce, (sexually or asexually) and transfer their genetic information to their offspring? What characteristic behaviors do animals perform that increase the odds of reproduction?  How are the characteristics of one generation related to the previous generation?  How does genetic variation among organisms affect survival and reproduction?  Why do individuals of the same species vary in how they look, function, and behave?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-LS1-4, MS-LS3-1, MS-LS3-2, MS-LS4-5

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will study the principles of heredity and genetics.  They will learn how organisms reproduce and transfer their genetic information to their offspring. Students will study how characteristics get passed on from generation to generation and research several genetic disorders that affect human offspring.  Students will use biotechnical processes to explore the genetic characteristics of organisms.  Students will conduct a DNA extraction and a microarray will be performed as a way of checking the genotypes of the offspring.

4

Earth’s History and Evolution


Unit Driving Question(s):

How do people reconstruct and date events in Earth’s planetary history?  What evidence shows that different species are related?  How do Earth’s major systems interact?  How does genetic variation among organisms affect survival and reproduction?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ESS1-4, MS-ESS2-2, MS-LS4-2, MS-LS4-3, MS-LS4-4, MS-LS4-5, MS-LS4-6, MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will study Earth’s history, geological time, and explore how organisms have evolved.  Students will examine the fossil record and construct explanations from mass extinctions.  Students will explore the concepts of natural selection and adaptation and will learn that traits of an organism can change as a result of environmental conditions or a need for survival.  Students will explore the similarities between organisms and use biotechnical processes, such as DNA fingerprinting, as means of identification. 

Investigations in Science 8 Course Overview (SCI1004)

In Investigations in Science 8,  students will experience an interdisciplinary approach to science content, exploring all two of the three domains of science (Physical & Earth Science) through hands-on explorations, productive discourse, and purposeful reading and writing.  The curriculum is problem/project-based where students apply their understanding of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to propose solutions to real world phenomenon/problems.  Students will take the Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (MISA) during March to assess their knowledge of the concepts learned throughout the middle school science curricular program.

Unit Title Content Focus
1

Weather and Climate


Unit Driving Question(s):

How do the properties and movements of water shape Earth’s surface and affect its systems? Within a natural or designed system, how does the transfer of energy drive the motion and/or cycling of the air and water?  What regulates weather and climate?  How do humans change the planet?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2, MS-ESS2-4, MS-ESS2-5, MS-ESS2-6, MS-ESS3-5

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, local and regional geography, and affect oceanic and atmospheric flow patterns.  The resulting complex patterns are major determinants of local weather patterns.  Students will explore the many interactions and patterns of around the globe to better understand their effect on weather and climate.  Students will use their knowledge to develop a detailed report that outlines the severe weather risks for a specified location and develop a proposal that details two innovative and sustainable solutions that address the severe weather risks and match the unique needs of the local community. 

2

Earth’s Materials and Processes


Unit Driving Question(s):

How and why is Earth constantly changing?  How do Earth’s major systems interact?  How do the properties and movements of water shape Earth’s surface and affect its systems?   How do people reconstruct and date events in Earth’s planetary history?  Why do the continents move, and what causes earthquakes and volcanoes?  How do natural hazards affect individuals and societies?  How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?  

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ESS2-1, MS-ESS2-2, MS-ESS2-3, MS-ESS3-1, MS-ESS3-2

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

All Earth processes are the result of energy flowing and matter cycling within and among the planet’s systems. This energy is derived from the Earth’s hot interior. The energy that flows and matter that cycles produce chemical and physical changes in Earth’s materials and living organisms. The planet’s systems interact over scales that range from microscopic to global in size, and they operate over fractions of a second to billions of years. From earthquakes and volcanoes to weathering and erosion, These interactions have shaped Earth’s history and will determine its future.  Students will learn concepts that enable them to evaluate the potential causes and effects of human-induced earthquakes and  develop a complete public service campaign plan that will help residents and lawmakers understand the best ways to reduce human-induced earthquakes in Maryland and its neighboring states.

3

Forces, Motion, and Interactions


Unit Driving Question(s):

How can one predict an object’s continued motion, changes in motion, or stability?  What are ways that we can describe an object's motion?  What is the law of inertia and how does that apply to the real world?  What is meant by for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction?  How do mass and velocity affect the momentum and acceleration of an object?  What is energy and how is it transferred and conserved?

Performance Expectations: 

MS- ETS 1-1, MS-PS2-1, MS-PS2-2, MS-PS3-1, MS-PS3-2, HS-PS2-3

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Forces, motion, and interactions encompasses the mechanical branch of physics, studying the nature of forces and its impact on the motion of objects.  Students will learn that the motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it and that the greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion. Forces on an object can also change its shape or orientation.  Using these learned concepts, students will create a design for an advanced rocket capable of launching large payloads and crew to Earth’s orbit. 

4

Earth, the Solar System, and the Universe

Unit Driving Question(s):

What is the universe, and what is Earth’s place within it?  What is the universe and what goes on in stars?  What are the predictable patterns caused by Earth’s movement in the solar system?  What makes up our solar system and how can the motion of Earth explain seasons and eclipses?

Performance Expectations: 

MS-ESS1-1, MS-ESS1-2, MS-ESS1-3, MS-ESS2-1, MS-PS1-4, MS-PS2-4, MS-PS2-5 MS-ETS1-1, MS-ETS1-2, MS-ETS1-3

Unit Anchoring Phenomena

Students will learn that the solar system consists of the sun and a collection of objects of varying sizes and conditions including planets and their moons that are held in orbit around the sun by its gravitational pull on them.  Much of the unit will focus on how the Earth and the moon, sun, and planets have predictable patterns of movement. These patterns, which are explainable by gravitational forces and conservation laws, in turn explain many large-scale phenomena observed on the Earth, moon, and other planets.  Students will be able to explain that patterns of the apparent motion of the sun, the moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, predicted, and explained with models.  The universe began with a period of extreme and rapid expansion known as the Big Bang. Earth and its solar system are part of the Milky Way galaxy, which is one of many galaxies in the universe.  Students will use their learning to design a realistic movie set that would simulate a habitable human settlement on another planet.

LITERACY

Digital Literacy 1 (ENG 1030)

The Digital Literacy 1 curriculum focuses on developing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing in a 21st-century approach. Working through a problem-based process, students learn to define real-world problems of interest, research the causes of those problems using real-time global texts, and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will advance their understanding of comprehension, analysis, and evaluation of text as well as vocabulary acquisition through reading complex informational and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will collaborate regularly through research and solution phases of their investigations. Students’ curiosity and motivation will engage them in their investigations while learning and refining the processes that will enrich all other courses and prepare them for college and career projects.

Digital Literacy 2 (ENG 1031)

The Digital Literacy 2 curriculum focuses on increasing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing through an integrated approach. By participating in a problem-based process, students learn to define, analyze, and evaluate real-world problems of interest related to standards-based curriculum topics. Students will use research skills to investigate problems using real-time global texts and then create solutions to address the problems. Students will participate in sustained inquiry, analysis, and evaluation of text through reading complex informational, expository, and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will hone their communication, collaboration, research, and problem-solving skills and learn to give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products during complex tasks. Digital Literacy creates authentic work for students to engage in by allowing for presentation of their solutions beyond the walls of the classroom.

Challenging Problem or Question

SEMESTER 1: HUMANITIES
SEMESTER 2: STEM

Digital Literacy 3 (ENG 1032)

The Digital Literacy 3 curriculum focuses on increasing critical and creative thinking through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing through an integrated approach. Students will be introduced to a variety of social issues from various perspectives, examine the history of social movements and the impact on social and economic justice, explore their identity, and understand the ways in which communities can respond to these complex issues. Students will explore social justice terminology in order to better advocate for a socially just society. They will have multiple opportunities to participate in book clubs, where they will interact with classmates to analyze social justice texts. Students will participate in sustained inquiry, analysis, and evaluation of text through reading complex informational, expository, and argumentative texts in a technology-rich medium. Students will use research skills to investigate a contemporary social issue using real-time global texts and then create solutions to address the issue at the individual and/or systemic level.

MS Academic Literacy (ENG 1029)

READING

Read 180 (ENG1017)

READ 180 is an intensive reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of students whose reading achievement is below the proficient level. The program directly addresses individual needs through adaptive and instructional software, high-interest reading materials, and direct instruction in reading and writing skills. Students rotate among a small group, teacher-directed lessons, a computer station for reinforcement and practice, and an independent reading center where students read books at their reading level. The program is designed to rapidly accelerate student achievement with the goal of bringing students to grade level.

SOCIAL STUDIES

The social studies program in middle school builds chronological and thematic understanding of world and United States history, while also developing the social studies strands of geography, economics, political systems, and culture. Each social studies unit is organized around a historical era and a social studies strand. A mix of modern content and the lessons of history provide the background knowledge and thinking skills that prepare students for high school instruction and their responsibilities as citizens, including meaningfully evaluating financial decisions.

In Grades 6 and 7, the focus of study is on ancient world history and culture from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. In Grade 8, students learn about the founding and early development of our nation, from the Revolution through Reconstruction. At all grade levels, students build understanding of the modern world by applying concepts of geography, economics, political systems, and culture to present-day scenarios.

Historical Inquiry in World Studies 6 (SOC1001) 
Historical Inquiry into Global Humanities 6 (SOC1009) 

Unit 6.1: Patterns of Settlement

Students learn how from hunter-gatherers, established farming communities to the rise of towns and cities, each society throughout time has exhibited different levels of complexity in their political, social and economic systems. Each society has strived to meet the wants and needs of its citizens and their successes and failures have become the building blocks for future societies to learn from to create more complex and sustaining civilizations. Unit Question: How do complex societies develop over time?

Unit 6.2: The Impact of Economies

Building on the idea that societies are complex due to various factors, students explore which factors makes a civilization an empire. From there, students explore the first dynasties of China to modern day China examining the relationship between the economic and political system and the impact the growth and decline of the economic system has on the structure and effectiveness of China's political system. Unit Question: How does economic growth and decline impact society?

Unit 6.3: Citizenship and Governance

Students learn how a political system, such as a democracy, strives to meet the common good of its citizens through shared accountability. Political systems influence how people in power make decisions that then impact the social and economic system of a civilization , including how they operate and who benefits from the choices. Unit Question: How does a government meet the common good of its citizens?

Unit 6.4: Cultural Systems

Students learn how culture is made up of beliefs, values, religion and traditions. Individuals and groups in societies use their cultural identity to influence structures and processes in their political, economic and social system. Culture is ever changing due to the interactions between groups of people from different societies. It is through these interactions facilitated many times both past and present by trade that people either accepted or resisted changes in their beliefs, ideas or traditions. Unit Question: How does culture influence the development of a civilization?

WORLD LANGUAGES

Students are encouraged to pursue World Language offerings as early as possible in middle school. The world languages available in middle schools are Chinese, French, Italian, Japanese, Spanish, and Spanish for Spanish Speakers. Offerings vary by school. The world language courses are high school credit-bearing courses. Please see page 4 for more information about high school credit in middle school. Course numbers are language and level dependent.

Level 1A/1B
HS credit

Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret basic information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and basic grammatical structures are taught within the context of these familiar topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

NOTE: Levels 1A and 1B may be offered in middle school as full-year courses. In that case, students must pass the full year of 1A and the full year of 1B in order to earn one high school credit.

Level 2A/2B
HS credit

Students expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

Level 3A/B
HS credit

Students continue to expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about a variety of familiar topics. They interpret detailed information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and more complex grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1 A/B (WLG2141A/B)
HS credit Spanish for Spanish Speakers 2 A/B (WLG2142A/B)
HS credit

Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1 A/B and Spanish for Spanish Speakers 2 A/B are offered at selected middle schools. Spanish for Spanish Speakers provides language instruction for students with proficiency in Spanish, either because it is their first language or it is spoken extensively in their home. Each course integrates history, culture, language, and connections related to the Spanish-speaking world.

World Language Immersion

Students who have completed an MCPS elementary school immersion program may join the immersion programs at the middle school level. Students who did not participate in the elementary program may test into an immersion program, if there is space available. The following middle schools offer these courses: Silver Spring International Middle School (Spanish/French), Westland Middle School (Spanish), Gaithersburg Middle School (French) and Hoover Middle School (Chinese).

The immersion language courses are high school creditbearing courses. Please see page 4 for more information about high school credit it middle school.

Grades 6–8 French (WLG2053 through  WLG2055)
HS credit

A two-period program of instruction enables students to enhance their language development through one period of language class and one period of the MCPS social studies curriculum in French.

Grade 6–8 Spanish (WLG2147 through WLG2149)
HS credit

A two-period program of instruction enables students in Grades 6 and 7 to enhance their language development through one period of language class and one period of the MCPS social studies curriculum in Spanish. In Grade 8, students continue with one period of language instruction.

Grade 6 Chinese (WLG 2034 through WLG 2036)
HS credit

This one-period course continues to build on the language skills acquired in the elementary school immersion program. Students transition into the regular MCPS Chinese 2 course in Grade 7.