Art Department

art student

Mr. Marshall White, Resource Teacher
Department Phone: 240-740-0434

 

 

 

Mrs. Lisa Dehays

Mrs. Kathie Grove, Department Head

Ms. Krista Tretick

 

Ms. Megan Voorhees

 


   

LINKS

 

 

COURSES

 

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

Summer Assignments:AP Studio Art

National Art Honor Society
Any student interested in joining the National Art Honor Society, please see Ms. White in B-127, any day during lunch period.

Studio Art 2D, Advanced Placement, course code 6486 (first semester) and 6487 (second semester)

(This is an individualized program that focuses on art projects that demonstrate the competencies expected of Advanced Placement art applicants, as identified by the College Board. Students assemble portfolios to meet the submission requirements for the AP Exam.
Prerequisite: 2 credits, including Fundamentals of Art, or Drawing and Design, and Studio Art 1A or 1B. This course may be repeated for credit.)

 

Background by Tomoko Kanamitsu

 


COURSES

 

   The Department offers a wide range of courses, from the fundamentals of studio art, ceramics, and photography to art & design at the International Baccalaureate level and Advanced Placement studio art.  Using traditional tools and modern digital equipment, the Art Department prepares students for a lifetime of art enjoyment. Every year, B-CC sends graduates to some of the country’s finest art schools and programs.

Following are brief descriptions of the courses offered. For specific information about prerequisites, and information about earning Student Service Learning credit for art projects, please see the MCPS High School Course Bulletin (link in left column).   

Introductory Studio Courses

Foundations of Art A – Grades 9-11

6055 (Basic Core Category 1 – satisfies Fine Arts requirement)  ½ credit

Students create assignments representing fine art, graphic art, and craft. They develop the basic skills needed to create drawings, paintings, crafts, and commercial designs. These studies are linked with information about historically significant artists or periods of art, including the contributions of minority artists. Students examine various sources of design and are given some choice of medium and subject matter.

Foundations of Art B – Grades 9-11

6056 (Basic Core Category 1 – satisfies Fine Arts requirement)   ½ credit

Students create assignments in printmaking, sculpture, environmental design, and visual communication representing fine art, graphic art, and craft. Films, lectures, and discussions focus on production techniques and on historically significant examples of each art form, representing a variety of cultures. Career information is provided.

Drawing and Design A – Grades 10-12

6355 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement)  ½ credit

Students focus on the creation of form and space using the elements of art and principles of design. They analyze the structure of forms and study drawing in perspective. Two-dimensional design problems consider the use of positive-negative elements, value, and color. Students discuss historically significant drawings and designs.

Drawing and Design B – Grades 10-12

6356 (satisfied Fine Arts requirement)  ½ credit

Students explore drawing, design, and illustration through exercises and a study of published examples. They study the works of outstanding artists as a basis for developing one’s drawing style. Students do abstract, three-dimensional design exercises and solve a design problem through a series of sketches and the construction of a prototype or model. 

Continuing  Studio Courses

Studio Art 1A – Grades 10-12

6105 (Basic Core Category 2 --satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students continue their study of the principles of design and use the elements of art in drawing, painting, printmaking, and/or sculpture with references to art masterpieces and work by contemporary artists. Students can exhibit their work.

Studio Art 1B – Grades 10-12

6106 (Basic Core Category 2 – satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

Students apply their skills in drawing, design, color theory, perspective, and three-dimensional form to their artwork. They analyze natural forms and the works of artists from a variety of cultures, which serve as inspiration. Students can exhibit their work.

Advanced Studio Art A – Grades 10-12

6313 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

This course is for students who have taken two art courses (1 credit) and who want additional time to continue the in-depth study that was begun in another art course. It may be repeated for credit.

Advanced Studio Art B – Grades 10-12

6314 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

This course is an extension of the activities suggested for Advanced Studio A. Students participate in individualized critiques of their own work and show evidence of a completed special project. May be repeated for credit.

Studio Art 2A – Grades 11-12

6205 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students concentrate on building a portfolio of their work and a collection of sketches using a preferred medium and showing details of composition. They study realistic, abstract, and nonobjective styles.

Studio Art 2B – Grades 11-12

6206 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students continue to build a portfolio using drawings, paintings, prints, and/or sculptures. Classroom reading assignments and visuals serve as the basis for discussing historically significant art styles and periods. 

Advanced Studio Courses

Studio Art 3A – Grade 12

6305 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

Students focus on a medium and art form of their choice, using both assigned and self-selected subject matter. They participate in group critiques and present their work in a portfolio.

Studio Art 3B – Grade 12

6306 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

Students prepare and present their artwork in a one-person show. They participate in group discussions in which they analyze significant works of art and periods of art history. Museum field trips and talks with visiting artists may be arranged.

Advanced Placement Studio Art

6486 and 6487 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit per course

New in school year 2005-2006, this individualized program focuses on art projects that demonstrate the competencies expected of Advanced Placement art applicants, as identified by the College Board. Students assemble portfolios to meet the submission requirements for AP exams. The prerequisites are 2 credits, including Fundamentals of Art, or Drawing and Design, and Studio Art 1A or 1B. This course may be repeated for credit. 

 

IB Art and Design

IB Art and Design 1A - Grades 11-12

6102 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

The prerequisites are Fundamentals of Art, or Drawing and Design, or Studio Art A&B, or ongoing private lessons.

IB Art and Design 1B - Grade 11-12

6103 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

The prerequisites are same as above and IB Art and Design 1A

IB Art and Design 2A - Grades 12

6107 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

The prerequisite is IB Art and Design 1B

IB Art and Design 2B - Grades 12

6108 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit) ½ credit

The prerequisite is IB Art and Design 2A 

Visual Art Center A & B

6490, 6491, 6492, 6493, 6494

These are advanced level courses taught in triple periods and offered at the Visual Art Center at Einstein High School. For details, see the MCPS High School Course Bulletin  and the Visual Art Center  web sites.

Ceramics & Sculpture

Introductory Ceramics & Sculpture Courses

Ceramics/Sculpture 1A – Grades 9-11

6381 (Basic Core Category 2 – satisfies Fine Arts requirement)  ½ credit

Students focus on the basic methods of forming and glazing clay pieces. They study the compositions and general characteristics of clay bodies and conduct a brief survey of significant styles in pottery and ceramic sculpture. An introduction to the potter’s wheel may be presented. Health and safety hazards are studied.

Ceramics/Sculpture 1B  Grades 9-11

6391 (Basic Core Category 2 – satisfies Fine Arts requirement)  ½ credit

Students focus on developing basic hand-building techniques with an emphasis on sculpture. They are introduced to glaze composition and procedures for glaze application. Craftsmanship and safe studio practices are emphasized. Related health and safety hazards are studied. 

Continuing and Advanced Ceramics & Sculpture

Ceramics/Sculpture 2A – Grades 10-12

6383 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students learn about natural and historically significant ceramic forms as the basis for pottery and sculpture designs. The formulation and firing characteristics of basic glazes are studied along with additional techniques for throwing on the potter’s wheel. Kiln theory is introduced as students learn to stack and monitor the kiln. Health hazards are reviews.

Ceramics/Sculpture 2B – Grades 10-12

6393 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students study sculpture and pottery styles and their sources. They may explore surface treatments for pottery such as overglazes, carving, underglazes, and several patina methods for sculpture. Craftsmanship and safe studio practices are emphasized. Health hazards are reviewed.

Ceramics/Sculpture 3A – Grades 11-12

6385 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students study the works of contemporary potters and sculptors in terms of form, finish, and conceptual statement. They combine hand-formed and thrown clay forms to create pottery or sculpture that reflect a personal interest or concern. They study glaze formulation and test tiles of glaze. They may assume some responsibility for kiln firings. Group critiques are conducted. Health hazards are reviewed.

Ceramics/Sculpture 3B – Grades 11-12

6386 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

In addition to further experimentation with sculpture finishes and glaze application, students create a series of forms that reflect a common source or theme. Similar efforts by professional artists and fellow students are studied. Class discussions focus on work in local shows and in periodicals. Techniques for displaying work are demonstrated in a student exhibit. Health hazards are reviewed. 

Photography Courses

Photography 1A – Grades 10-12

6345 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement) ½ credit

Students learn how to use a camera, process film, and print black-and-white photographs. Aesthetics are considered in composition exercises and serve as a topic in viewing films and in class discussions. Several theme projects are assigned through which students demonstrate their sensitivity to subject matter, lighting, form, and composition. Contemporary photographic technology is demonstrated and used where available. Safe darkroom practices are learned, and opportunities to exhibit work are presented. Related health hazards are studied. Students produce a portfolio of their work.

Photography 1B – Grades 10-12

6346 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement) ½ credit

Students focus on a variety of subjects, including still life, portrait, landscape, and architecture. They discuss the chemistry of photography and the operation of a darkroom with reference to health, safety, and economics. They also discuss and critique work done with a digital camera and computer. Students conduct an overview of the history of photography and discuss the works of known photographers. Students mat or mount some work for display. They may select slide essays, photo-silkscreens, animated films, photo CDs, and videotape as project options. They produce and exhibit a portfolio of their work. Health hazards are reviewed.

Photography 2A – Grades 11-12

6347 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students create, produce, and develop a body of work using a variety of aesthetic concepts. Advanced camera and darkroom techniques and digital camera technology are demonstrated and discussed. Students continue studies in the history of photography, photographers, and technical developments. Composition and aesthetic criteria are stressed. Students mat and display their work for exhibit. Career opportunities open to individuals who study photography are presented throughout the course. Students produce a portfolio of their work.

Photography 2B – Grades 11-12

6348 (satisfies Fine Arts requirement; certificate of merit)  ½ credit

Students develop a portfolio of work with the option of using a unifying concept of theme. They investigate a variety of techniques and relate them to expression. They continue to study the history of photography and may emphasize the achievements of one period or photographer. They also continue to study digital camera technology. They are presented with an opportunity to apply aesthetic criteria to a variety of photographic exhibits. Optional projects related to contemporary techniques also may be presented. Photographs will be discussed in terms of the photographer’s intent and interpretation as well as technical skill and aesthetics. They produce and exhibit a portfolio of their work.

 

 


 

AP STUDIO ART SUMMER ASSIGNMENT:

1.       Self-portrait:  Arrange interesting side lighting, and be sure

to add a background or setting (no floating heads).  Make use of dramatic lighting, maybe even a flashlight held from below.

 

2.       Still life:  Set up a still life with a strong light source, near a          window or with a flashlight.  Try eggs on torn or crumpled paper,     tin cans or glass jars, or fruit on drapery, or raid the vegetable bin of the refrigerator.

 

3.       Magnify a metallic object:  Zero in on a section of metallic objects, such as a closeup of part of a bike or motorcycle, or spoons or an eggbeater.  Make use of hard-edge metal reflections and cast shadows.

 

4.       Landscape:  Do a drawing on location—the beach, the park, looking down your street, your backyard, or a study of part of a tree form.

 

Suggested Media:  Do not do all the works in pencil; if you use pencil, it must be used darkly to make an effective slide. Try black ballpoint pen, crosshatched, colored pencils, charcoal pencil, pastels, markers, or any assorted materials you may have at home.  BUT REMEMBER TO USE THE ENTIRE PAGE!  You may work in your sketchbook if it is at least 8” x 10”, or you may take home paper from the classroom.