Social Studies Department

Staff

Social Studies Department

Jeff Newby - Resource Teacher
-- Phone: 240-740-1374
-- AP World History, AP Psychology



Chris Danis
-- US History, AP Human Geography

Cindy Loveland
-- US History

 Debra Delavan

-- Honors NSL Government

Mary Wagner
-- AP NSL Government, Comparative Religion, SSL Coordinator

Pamela Rowe
-- US History, AP US History

Rachel Givens
-- African American History, Modern World History, International Human Rights

Jordan Rowell

-- Modern World History

Robert Loftus
-- NSL Government, Modern World History, Law 1

Scott Mendenhall
-- US History, AP Research

Sean Gibbons
-- Modern World History, US History, AP Macroeconomics, AP Microeconomics

Steven Cain
-- Modern World History, AP World History, AP Comparative Government

Stephanie Staub
-- US History, AP Psychology

Alecia Walker

-- Honors NSL Government, Psychology

Courses


African American History

This course is a survey of the individuals, forces, and events that make up the experiences of African Americans in the United States. By exploring those forces, and by highlighting those individuals who helped shape the development of America, students learn that the "Black Experience" can serve as the testing ground for American democratic ideas. Emphasis is given to the impact of major events in our history on African Americans. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

0.5 credits per semester

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Ancient and Medieval History

This is a new 1 semester course that combines Ancient and Medieval History. This is a survey course of the evolution of society from the Fertile Crescent through Greek and Roman Civilizations. Students examine the rise of civilizations of the Near East and their legacies. Egyptian Greek and Roman societies are studied from their historical roots through their decline with a special emphasis on the contributions these societies made to “western civilization.” In addition, the course surveys the history of medieval Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Origins of the Renaissance. The course will also study the cultural, intellectual, and political development of European society, as well as wars and crises that threatened the stability of European Society.

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Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations

This course is a survey of the evolution of society from the Fertile Crescent through Greek and Roman civilizations. Students examine the rise of civilizations in the Near East and their legacies. Greek civilization is studied from its historical roots through Alexander's empire, emphasizing forces of change and aspects that provide a basis for Western thought. The course concludes with a study of the Roman Era. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Advanced Placement Art History

Students prepare for the AP Art History exam. They study the evolution of Western and non-European art in contemporary society by examining the major forms of visual expression in world cultures. Students analyze architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts within a historical and cultural context. They also focus on the ancient through the medieval periods of history, as prescribed by the College Board curriculum. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Comparative Religion

Why are there multiple Hindu gods? What is the Eightfold Path in Buddhism? What does it mean when Jews keep kosher? How do the many different branches of Christianity differ? What are the Five Pillars of Islam? Comparative Religion is a one-semester class that answers these questions and many more. We will study Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Each unit focuses on the history and current beliefs and practices of followers of each religion, and there will be guest speakers or field trips for each unit. Students will also do an independent research project on a religion of their choice. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Economics

How do the economic concepts of supply and demand affect my life? Why is our national debt so huge? How do small business owners make decisions about how to run their businesses? How does the stock market work? What are the benefits and dangers of credit? Economics is a one-semester survey course open to 11th and 12th graders. Students will study government policy, the actions of small business owners, and more. Each student will play the Stock Market Game and learn more about investing and saving money. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. By earning a passing score on the AP Macroeconomics test you can earn 3 college credits for this 1 semester course. This class is offered 1st semester and should be paired with AP Microeconomics [course #2316] for the 2nd semester.

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Advanced Placement Microeconomics

AP Microeconomics begins with a study of fundamental economic concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, production possibilities, specialization, and comparative advantage. Major topics include the nature of functions of product markets; factor markets; and efficiency, equity, and the role of government. By earning a passing score on the AP Microeconomics test you can earn 3 college credits for this 1 semester course. This class is offered 2nd semester and should be paired with AP Macroeconomics [course #2315] in the 1st semester.

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Advanced Placement European History A & B

This college-level course is a survey in European history from the 15th century to the present. A college-level text is used, and students engage in college-level writing and discussion. This course prepares students for the AP European History examination. Grade Level: 11, 12

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Advance Placement Comparative Government and Politics

 AP Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and the political, economic, and social challenges among six selected countries: Great Britain, Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Additionally, students examine how different governments solve similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues. Think of it as an AP current events course!

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Global Issues and the Law

This is the study of prehistory to the Roman Empire with an emphasis on Greece, Egypt and China. Among activities, students will learn the basics of archaeology, and investigate through artifacts, elements of ancient civilizations. At the completion of the course, students should be able to recognize the contributions of ancient civilizations to modem ones. This is a course for creative academic students who want to use their abilities to produce a series of projects to investigate the secrets of the Pyramids and find out how Rome created an empire and allowed it to decay. This course is often taken in conjunction with Medieval History in the second semester.

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Advanced Placement Human Geography A/B

The college-level course is designed to study the historical and sociological, economical, and political forces, which shaped society. Students will examine and discuss national and international policies, attitudes and their correlation to prevailing approaches of today global connectivity. This course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to analyze human social organization and its environmental consequences. The emphasis is on learning, discovering, and thinking critically. Students will use scientific methods to explore any opposing views. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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International Human Rights

This course addresses the history of the human rights ideal and crimes against humanity, including genocide, that have occurred during the 20th century. Students will evaluate the impact of the Holocaust on the need to define genocide and examine existing human rights and humanitarian law instruments and the mechanisms for their enforcement, from the Nuremberg trials to the International Criminal Courts at the Hague. Students will research the human rights records of many governments, both historical and current, and examine the role of U.S. foreign policy in the defense of human rights. The course will also explore the international human rights movement, its history, methods, and impact, and outline potential careers in human rights. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original historical research on a topic of their choosing or create a political advocacy and awareness project on a current human rights violation. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Law

Law 1 & 2

Students will learn the process by which American society seeks justice and order through law, and ways in which people can participate intelligently in those processes. Students examine history and philosophy of law, how the law works, and can be made to work in actual situations. Through role-plays, simulations, games, guest speakers, and case analysis, major areas to be studied include constitutional law, crime, and criminal rights and procedures. Law 2 is a continuation of Law I and provides a more in depth look at the criminal and civil trial process and the role of the attorney. The units include terrorism, constitutional law, civil law and torts, family law, and consumer law. Students apply legal precedents to real and hypothetical situations. Opportunities are provided to observe the legal process in action, explore law-related careers and participate in mock trials. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Advanced Law

This course will provide in-depth study if basic principals of civil, criminal, and juvenile and constitutional law. Successful completion of Law (2312) is required. This course is dependent upon class discussion and participation. Topics that are emphasized include civil and domestic law. Considerable effort is made to understand current legal cases in relation to basic legal principals. Case studies will count as a significant part of each student's grade.

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Latin American History

This course provides an overview of the cultural background and historical development of the nations of Latin America, their role in the world today, and their future. Problems of population distribution, cultural and economic influences and ownership, and political and social change are studied.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Medieval History

This is a survey course that begins with the civilizations of the ancient Near East and continues through the Reformation in Europe. Students focus on the geographic, political, social, economic, and cultural factors that have shaped the development of ideas and institutions from Mesopotamia to the present day. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Model United Nations A/B

This course is different from many in that it is largely student-centered and student-directed. Students participate in a daily simulation of the United Nations General Assembly with each student representing a different country. International relations, contemporary global affairs and the changing world order will be the content focus. Students will generate their own specific topics (rotating) for each term. In the past, major topics have included terrorism, child labor, nuclear proliferation, foreign aid and diplomatic immunity. Developing confident speaking, debating and conflict resolution skills will be emphasized. Grade Level: 10,11,12

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Modern World History

Modern World History A

Modern World History A is a survey of the history of the world from about 1500 to 1914. An introductory unit examines the basis for the modern world by looking at civilizations throughout the world around the year 1500. Students then study growing global links as all areas of the world become increasingly interconnected. The next topic is revolution in thought and action with emphasis given to the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, political revolutions around the world, global economic changes, nationalism and imperialism. Emphasis is given to literature that illustrates these periods, analysis of primary source materials, and studying topics from multiple perspectives. Students can take the course at the honors level.

Modern World History B

Modern World History B is a survey of the history of the world in the 201h century. Students begin this course with a study of World War I and II and the political and ideological forces that emerged between these two global conflicts. The post-World War II period is analyzed in terms of political and economic developments, the growing movement for self-determination, and the increasing interdependence of the world. The final unit is a problem-solving unit requiring students to assess global issues in the post-Cold War period. Emphasis is given to literature that illustrates these periods, analysis of primary source materials, and studying topics from multiple perspectives. Students can take the course at the honors level.

Advanced Placement World History A/B

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course focuses primarily on the past one thousand years of global experience, builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage prior to 1000 B.C.E. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms the organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity from past to present. This course prepares students for the AP World History exam. It is expected that students enroll for both semesters.

Note: AP World History may be used instead of Modern World History A and B to satisfy the graduation requirements of a year of World History.

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National, State, and Local Government

National, State, and Local Government A

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental concepts concerning the structure, function, and principles of our federal system of government on the national, state, and local levels. The nature of government is analyzed, as well as the nature of politics and the political process. Each of the three branches of government - legislative, executive, judicial examined in depth, concluding with the workings of the jurisprudence system. Students can take the course at the honors level.

National, State, and Local Government B

Having identified the structure and function of government in National, State, and Local Government A, this course provides students with case studies of government in action. Students evaluate the historical development of civil rights and the due process system in the United States. In other units, students assess the concepts of United States foreign policy and it's effectiveness in post World War II America. Lastly, students analyze the basic concepts of the American economy and our interdependence with other nations for trade. Students can take the course at the honors level.

Advanced Placement National, State, and Local Government A & B

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course focuses primarily on the past one thousand years of global experience, builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage prior to 1000 B.C.E. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms the organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity from past to present. This course prepares students for the AP World History exam. It is expected that students enroll for both semesters.

Note: AP World History may be used instead of Modern World History A and B to satisfy the graduation requirements of a year of World History.

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Psychology

Psychology 1 & 2

Students are introduced to the scientific study of human behavior and thinking in Psychology 1. While learning how to apply psychological principles to daily life, students investigate major domains of psychology, including social psychology, research methods, the brain, human development, and consciousness. Psychology 2 provides further investigation into topics such as learning, memory, intelligence, personality, and psychological disorders. Both semesters end with a culminating project.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 is a prerequisite to Psychology 2 Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Advanced Placement PsychologyA/B

This college-level course prepares students for the AP exam. We study all aspects of human behavior--your behavior! Can someone get drunk by just thinking they are consuming alcohol? Do most teenagers agree with their parents? In 1997, 39 members of the Heaven's Gate Cult committed suicide because they believed they would be transported to a hidden spaceship on the other side of the Hale-Bopp Comet. Why? Does a good night's sleep actually make people smarter? These types of questions are discussed in AP Psychology. Last year, most AP Psychology students passed the AP Exam and earned college credit! If you are reading on an honors level in an English, Social Studies, or Science class, you can handle the textbook that we use. Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

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Advanced Placement United States History

This course is for students desiring a freshman college-level course in United States history. The course is a survey of this nation's history from 1607 to the present, using a college-level text and requiring college-level writing and discussion. Grade Level: 11, 12

On-level and honors US History is also available.

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Last Updated: 9/19/17

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